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mimapr

Encuestas Recientes En Usa

43 posts in this topic

Quiero abrir este tema para llevar un record de las encuestas en USA, comenzando desde hoy. Asi que cada vez que salga una encuesta nueva favor de postearla aqui .. :photo-10:

[size="5"][color="#FF0000"][b]
NBC/WSJ poll: Obama bouncing back [/b][/color][/size]
[b]The president's approval rating returns to the 50s, but challenges remain, according to the latest poll [/b]

[b]+-WASHINGTON — What a difference a few weeks can make.

Last month, Republicans were celebrating their midterm victories; Democrats were licking their electoral wounds; and President Barack Obama’s approval rating was stuck in the mid-'40s.

But after a five-week stretch that included bipartisan legislative achievements in the lame-duck session of Congress, mostly positive economic news and Obama’s well-received speech honoring the victims of the tragic shootings in Arizona, the political world has taken an abrupt turn in direction.

According to the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, Obama’s approval rating has surged above 50 percent; confidence in the economy also has spiked; and the Democratic Party — but not the GOP — now enjoys a net-positive rating from the American public.
[color="#FF0000"]
“The last six weeks have been the best six weeks the president has had in his first two years in office," says Democratic pollster Peter D. Hart, who conducted the survey with Republican pollster Bill McInturff. [/color]

But Hart cautions that challenges remain for Obama and the Democrats, with a majority still believing the country is on the wrong track and half disapproving of the president’s economic handling.

.Across-the-board improvement

In the poll, Obama’s job-approval rating stands at 53 percent, which is an eight-point jump from last month and represents his highest rating in the survey since July 2009.

The improvement for Obama was across the board: Approval among independents moved from 35 percent in December to 46 percent now; among Democrats, it went from 76 percent to 86 percent; and among Republicans, it went from 11 percent to 15 percent.

“I think that this increase in his job approval is very important,” says McInturff, the GOP pollster. “At the same time, these kind of rises have been transitory,” he adds, referring to former President Clinton’s immediate — but later fleeting — bump in approval after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

The poll also finds that 40 percent of respondents label Obama as a political moderate, compared with 45 percent who see him as a liberal and 11 percent who view him as a conservative. That moderate number is the highest for Obama in the NBC/WSJ poll, even higher than it was before his inauguration.

The survey — which was taken from Jan. 13-17 of 1,000 adults (200 by cell phone), and which has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.1 percentage points — comes after a series of triumphs and positive developments for the Obama White House:

— on Dec. 17, the president signed into law bipartisan legislation extending the Bush-era tax cuts for all income levels, and also extending unemployment benefits and cutting payroll taxes;

— on Dec. 22, he signed into law the repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” ban on gays serving openly in the military;

— also on Dec. 22, the Senate ratified a nuclear arms-reduction treaty with Russia;

— on Jan. 7, the Labor Department released data showing that the unemployment rate declined from 9.8 percent in November to 9.4 percent in December (although it also showed the economy adding a lower-than-expected 103,000 jobs last month);

— on Jan. 12, the president delivered a well-received speech honoring the victims from the shootings in Arizona. (The poll finds that 74 percent approve of his handling of the tragedy.)

McInturff says it’s unclear how much Obama’s increase can be attributed to each of these events since the last poll, which was conducted Dec. 9-13. “It’s beyond my pay grade to sort out how much is lame duck, how much is Arizona,” he said.

How long will it last?
What is clear, though, is that Obama will ride into his State of the Union address next week in a stronger position than many would have thought after November, when the Republican Party won control of the U.S. House and picked up seats in the U.S. Senate.

.“This is a person who will walk in the hall with a great deal of confidence and with the wind at his back,” says Hart.

..But how long will it last? The poll shows plenty of tests for Obama and his administration. For instance, 45 percent approve of his economic handling (up three points), but 50 percent disapprove.

What’s more, 56 percent think the country is on the wrong track, although that’s a seven-point drop from last month.

And a combined 82 percent say the war in Afghanistan has either gotten worse or stayed the same, with another 71 percent believing the U.S. will ultimately have to withdraw and leave the country without a stable democratic government.

The GOP’s short honeymoon
[color="#FF0000"]Republicans have now been in control of the House for less than two weeks, but the survey suggests an abbreviated honeymoon for the GOP.
[/color]
Just 25 percent say that the Republicans in Congress will bring “the right kind of change” to the country. That’s compared with 42 percent who said that after Democrats took over the House in 2007, and 37 percent who said that after Republicans gained control in 1995.

In addition, a majority (55 percent) believe congressional Republicans will be too inflexible in dealing with President Obama, while an equal number (55 percent) say Obama will strike the right balance.

On House Republicans’ goal to repeal Obama’s health care law — an effort that cleared the chamber on Wednesday — 45 percent support eliminating the law and 46 percent oppose the GOP effort.

And attitudes about the Republican Party have declined, with 34 percent viewing the GOP positively and 40 percent negatively — down from its 38-37 percent favorable/unfavorable rating last month.

By comparison, the Democratic Party’s fav/unfav in the current poll is 39-35 percent, up from its 37-41 percents score from last month.

“I think this has been a pretty short Republican honeymoon,” McInturff says.

Hart: “I think the president has the benefit of the doubt, and the Republicans — based on this data — have the burden of proof.”


In the emerging — and very early — race for the 2012 GOP presidential nomination, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee lead the hypothetical pack, with Romney the first choice of 19 percent of Republicans and independents, and Huckabee at 18 percent.

They are followed by former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin (at 14 percent), former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (at 10 percent), Texas Congressman Ron Paul (at 8 percent) and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty (at 5 percent).

In hypothetical general-election contests, the poll shows Obama leading Huckabee by 10 points, 51 to 41 percent, and Gingrich by 19 points, 54 to 35 percent. The December NBC/WSJ poll had the president leading Romney by seven points and Palin by 22 points.

On the economy, Arizona and Palin
In other poll findings:

— 40 percent believe the U.S. economy will improve in the next 12 months, up eight points from December;

— 53 percent think the United States will be better off five years from now, which is up 16 points from last August;

— only 24 percent say that extreme political rhetoric contributed to the shootings in Arizona, while 71 percent say it was an isolated incident caused by a disturbed person;
[color="#FF0000"]
— and Palin’s favorable/unfavorable rating stands at 27-49 percent, with her favorable score tying its lowest-ever point in the survey.[/color] [/b]

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Parece que el hoyo es profundo.... Pero veamos en cuanto la atencion publica sea desviada del tiroteo de Tucson y el pueblo se percate de los malos manejos del timador en jefe...

[url="http://www.presstv.ir/detail/161015.html"]Americans dissatisfied with Obama: Pol[/url]l
Thu Jan 20, 2011 2:1AM
[img]http://previous.presstv.ir/photo/20110120/Baqeri_d20110120004136530.jpg[/img]
Most Americans believe that President Barack Obama needs to do a better job by putting US national interests ahead of his own political considerations, a new survey shows.


About 70 percent of Americans in a newly released USA Today/Gallup poll said Obama should do more to bring changes the country needs, UPI reported on Wednesday.

[b]The participants believe Obama has not succeeded in bringing about change which was a central theme of his 2008 election campaign.[/b]

“Democrats' approval ratings range from 53 percent for bringing about needed change to 84 percent for having strong moral character while less than half of Republicans favor Obama on any category,” the survey showed.

[b]A majority of Americans also believe the president should show greater understanding of the problems ordinary people face and be a more decisive leader.[/b]

[b][color="#FF0000"]“Overall, 47 percent of Americans approve of the president's job performance and 49 percent disapprove,” the survey showed.[/color][/b]

The telephone poll of 1,032 adults was conducted from Friday through Sunday with a margin of error of 4 percent.

[b]A survey released in mid-October by Gallup also showed that 54 percent of US voters believed Obama did not deserve a second term in office, with only 39 percent supporting his re-election.[/b]

[b]Obama's average approval rating, which has declined each quarter since he took office in 2009, has dropped to a new low in the fourth quarter of 2010.[/b]

An unemployment rate of nearly 10 percent, a home foreclosure crisis and the war in Afghanistan are major issues that swayed voters to support the Republicans in the recent elections in the United States.

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:hysterical: Mr Girlie Man tuvo que buscar un website de[b] Iran[/b] para una encuesta negativa de Obama......jajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajaja Como diria Napo...que brutt que brutt.....

[b]
About PressTV

Press TV takes revolutionary steps as the [color="#FF0000"]first Iranian international news network[/color], broadcasting in English on a round-the-clock basis.

Our global Tehran-based headquarters is staffed with outstanding Iranian and foreign media professionals.

Press TV is extensively networked with bureaus located in the world's most strategic cities


Contact Us
PRESS TV
6, East 2nd St.
Farhang Blvd. Saadat Abad
19977-66411, Tehran
IRAN

.[/b]

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[color="#000080"]Que bueno para Obama que sus numeros estan subiendo, felicidades mi presidente![/color]

[color="#000080"]Ya que Mima SE LE OLVIDO poner el URL del articulo, un search del titulo me llevo a esta pagina:[/color]
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41161439/ns/politics-more_politics/

[color="#000080"]Escondido en el texto del articulo estaba este URL, que te lleva a las metricas de la encuesta:[/color]
http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/MSNBC/Sections/NEWS/A_Politics/___Politics_Today_Stories_Teases/11023%20Jan%20NBC-WSJ%20Filled%20in%20beta.pdf


[color="#000080"]En la pagina 16 esta esta pregunta:[/color]

[color="#FF0000"]And, thinking about something else…
Q15 Generally speaking, do you think of yourself as (ROTATE:) a Democrat, a Republican, an independent, or
something else? (IF "DEMOCRAT" OR "REPUBLICAN," ASK:) Would you call yourself a strong
(Democrat/Republican) or not a very strong (Democrat/Republican)? (IF "NOT SURE," CODE AS "NOT
VERY STRONG DEMOCRAT/REPUBLICAN.") (IF "INDEPENDENT," ASK:) Do you think of yourself as
closer to the Republican Party, closer to the Democratic Party, or do you think of yourself as strictly
independent? (IF "NOT SURE," CODE AS "STRICTLY INDEPENDENT.")
Strong Democrat ............................... 20
Not very strong Democrat ................. 11
Independent/lean Democrat .............. 10
Strictly Independent........................... 18
Independent/lean Republican............ 11
Not very strong Republican............... 9
Strong Republican............................. 12
Other (VOL)....................................... 7
Not sure........................................... 2[/color]

[color="#000080"]Sumemos:
Democratas:20+11+10=41

Republicanos: 11+9+12=32[/color]


[color="#000080"]Sabiendo de la pela asquerosa que el GOP le dio a los democratas hace solo dos meses, donde 63 congresistas democratas perdieron sus puestos, dudo mucho que los democratas esten 9 puntos sobre los republicanos. Mima, igual que hace diez dias atras, tu partido político te toma el pelo y te da mentiras para que tu se las pases a los demas.[/color] Edited by Artaguito

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Sabiendo que Rasmussen fue el mas certero en la eleccion del 2004 y la del 2008, esta grafica tiene mas credibilidad (hacen un poll cada semana) que el de NBC/WSJ:
[img]http://www.rasmussenreports.com/var/plain/storage/images/media/obama_total_approval_graphics/january_2011/obama_total_approval_january_19_2011/443853-1-eng-US/obama_total_approval_january_19_2011.jpg[/img]

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/obama_administration/daily_presidential_tracking_poll Edited by Artaguito

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Entonces tu quieres decir que los independientes son todos democratas???? :yahoo:


Bueno ya que gusta el reporte de Rasmussen, pues esto es lo que dice:


Daily Presidential Tracking Poll
Wednesday, January 19, 2011
[size="3"][b]The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Wednesday shows that 28% of the nation's voters Strongly Approve of the way that Barack Obama is performing his role as president. Thirty-seven percent (37%) Strongly Disapprove,[/b][/size]

[size="3"][b]
Fifty-three percent (53%) of Democrats Strongly Approve and 68% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Those numbers aren’t a lot different from earlier polling. However, the president is improving among unaffiliated voters. Just 32% of unaffiliateds now Strongly Disapprove of his performance.
[/b][/size]


:53silbando:

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[quote name='mimapr' timestamp='1295493266' post='2918073']
:hysterical: Mr Girlie Man tuvo que buscar un website de[b] Iran[/b] para una encuesta negativa de Obama......jajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajaja Como diria Napo...que brutt que brutt.....

[b]
About PressTV

Press TV takes revolutionary steps as the [color="#FF0000"]first Iranian international news network[/color], broadcasting in English on a round-the-clock basis.

Our global Tehran-based headquarters is staffed with outstanding Iranian and foreign media professionals.

Press TV is extensively networked with bureaus located in the world's most strategic cities


Contact Us
PRESS TV
6, East 2nd St.
Farhang Blvd. Saadat Abad
19977-66411, Tehran
IRAN

.[/b]
[/quote]


Yo se que en las mentes enfermizas y paranoicas cabe la posibilidad de que consideren que una empresa noticiosa irani sea Republicana...

se te olvido la parte sobre vision:
VISION

Heeding the often neglected voices and perspectives of a great portion of the world;

Embracing and building bridges of cultural understanding;

Encouraging human beings of different nationalities, races and creeds to identify with one another;

Bringing to light untold and overlooked stories of individuals who have experienced the vitality and versatility of political and cultural divides firsthand.

Diantre... la vision de los iranies suena muy parecido a la vision de Obama...

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Has Obama Hurt Race Relations?

By Elspeth Reeve | January 19, 2011 5:17pm
Has Obama Hurt Race Relations? Rusty Darbonne/Flickr

Americans are less convinced that our first black president has helped race relations than they were at his inauguration, a Washington Post/ABC News poll reports. The percentage of people who say President Obama would make race relations better has declined every year since he was inaugurated.

[i]Two years ago, 58 percent of Americans said President Obama would make race relations better; just 7 percent said he'd make them worse. A year ago, 41 percent said Obama had made it better and 12 percent said he'd made it worse. This year, the percentage of people who think the president has helped race relations has dropped to 35 percent, with 14 percent saying he'd hurt them. Now, almost half--49 percent--say he hasn't made much difference.[/i]

Slate's Dave Weigel notes that when the numbers are broken down between blacks and whites, you get interesting results. [b]Among both whites and blacks, the percentage who say Obama has made things better has drooped by 24 points, Weigel notes--though for blacks, it's dropped from 75 percent, but from whites, it's dropped from 55 percent[/b]. "Here's a chaser that I'm not sure how to interpret," he adds: [b]"since Obama was sworn in, the percentage of Americans saying blacks have achieved equality has risen from 35 to 42 percent. It has remained static among blacks, and spiked nine points among whites.[/b]" The percentage of blacks who think they'll never achieve full equality, or won't achieve it in their life time, is 45 percent. That number hasn't changed much since September 2008.

Por lo visto Obama va a ocasionar una mayor incidencia de politica donde los votantes se uniran en base a factores raciales ...

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ay bendito.....imaginate los Iranies adoran a Obama son sus amigos.... :hysterical: :hysterical: Me voy a dormir no puedo con esto... estos republicanos estan del carajo...jajajajajajajaja Se las inventan en el aire.....buscando noticias con los arabes....jajajajajajajaja Orita criticaste una noticia de un democrata desempleado, pero trae noticias de Iran..jejejejejejeje :hysterical:

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No solo desempleado, sino buscando congraciarse con el electorado liberal.

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[quote name='Artaguito' timestamp='1295494039' post='2918077']
Sabiendo que Rasmussen fue el mas certero en la eleccion del 2004 y la del 2008, esta grafica tiene mas credibilidad (hacen un poll cada semana) que el de NBC/WSJ:
[img]http://www.rasmussenreports.com/var/plain/storage/images/media/obama_total_approval_graphics/january_2011/obama_total_approval_january_19_2011/443853-1-eng-US/obama_total_approval_january_19_2011.jpg[/img]

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/obama_administration/daily_presidential_tracking_poll
[/quote]

Esta grafica [u]es devastadora[/u]!! Porque no es de solo unos meses!!!!
Desde Agosto 2009 no sube!!! :eek:

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[size="3"][color="#000080"][b]Surging President Obama hopes to continue upswing with State of the Union address[/b][/color][/size]
BY Thomas M. Defrank
DAILY NEWS WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF

Tuesday, January 25th 2011, 4:00 AM


WASHINGTON - [color="#FF0000"]To the surprise of just about everyone in D.C. power corridors, Barack Obama has stabilized a presidency that not long ago looked like a forlorn hope.[/color]
[color="#FF0000"]
For the first time in more than a year, his approval numbers have jumped past 50%. Consumer confidence is rising, along with the stock market and the economy. The number of Americans who believe the country is on the right track is climbing again.[/color]

Obama plainly benefits from the collective guarded optimism and he'll address the nation - and a GOP-dominated Congress - on sturdier footing on Tuesday night.

"He's had a really good six weeks and you can see it in his confidence level and his demeanor," said Cal Jillson, a political science professor at Southern Methodist University.

Moreover, Obama's new pragmatic course correction has resonated with many Americans.
[b][color="#FF0000"]
"The public liked his deal with Republicans and are saying, 'We want more of that,'" Jillson added.[/color][/b]

A year ago, Obama's State of the Union launched perhaps the worst year for a President since Richard Nixon resigned in disgrace in 1974.

It was galling enough that a no-name GOP congressman called him a liar. Then the fall elections decisively repudiated his stewardship, costing Democrats the House.

Ever since, Obama has moved briskly to the middle. The bipartisan deal on taxes irked his left, but signaled he was more interested in getting something done than scoring ideological points.

Meanwhile, his appointment of corporate titan William Daley as chief of staff launched a major effort to reconnect with business leaders he has often demonized.

"He's done an awful lot of things since the election to move to the right I didn't think he would do and have been pretty smart," said former Rep. Vin Weber (R-Minn.).

Now that he's bottomed out, Democratic allies argue Obama must continue his swivel to the middle by crafting a positive vision of the future while meeting the GOP halfway on deficit cuts.

"He needs to appeal to the 20% that's moderate and persuadable," said top Democratic political strategist Mark Siegel.

If there's any doubt Obama now gets the new centrist reality, it should be erased by his response to the Tucson horror.

Not his speech at the memorial service, although his powerful, healing remarks drew rare bipartisan accolades and burnished Obama's political comeback.

It was, instead, his decision to offer an Air Force One seat to a rookie congressman who famously called him the worst President in history in a campaign spot.

Lyndon Johnson would have taken his wrath out on a water project in young Ben Quayle's home district. Barack Obama saw an opportunity to be magnanimous - and presidential - and grabbed it.

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Asi que Obama va a sugerir recortes en el gobierno? Pero y no era untarle dinero a cuanta pendeja el se inventara bueno para la economia? Que paso con los Keynesian principles?
Lo que diga hoy Barry Soetoro en su speech es inaceptable, regresemos por lo menos a los niveles de gastos del 2008 si quieren en verdad aliviar el problema.

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WEPAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.


Mr.BO no ha estabilizado ni su propio caminar, eso lo dejaron claro los votantes en Nov 10. :tongue0011:

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Del Washington Post... Lo mas reciente:

[b][size="3"][color="#FF0000"]Poll: Budget impasse cements public’s disapproval of Washington[/color][/size][/b]
By Dan Balz and Jon Cohen, Tuesday, March 15, 12:19 AM

The early battles in Washington this year have cemented the public’s disapproval of the political system and the country’s leadership, [u]with confidence in congressional Republicans sagging [/u][b]and majorities disapproving of how President Obama is handling top domestic issues, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll[/b].

In a sweeping indicator of dissatisfaction with Washington, [u]just 26 percent of Americans say they are optimistic about “our system of government and how well it works,” [b]a low point in polls dating to 1974[/b]. This gloomy assessment is shared [b]by Democrats and Republicans[/b], even as they agree on little else.[/u]

Large majorities in the poll say a partial shutdown of the federal government would be a “bad thing,” but each side squarely blames the other for not compromising in the budget negotiations. Eighty-nine percent of Democrats say Republicans in Congress are not doing enough to strike a deal with the Obama administration, and 81 percent of Republicans see the president as intransigent.

Congress and the White House are approaching another deadline this week to resolve their stalemate over funding the government for the rest of the fiscal year. Obama said Friday that an additional stopgap measure might be necessary before the sides can reach a compromise. But that only forestalls a potentially more contentious fight over next year’s budget.

The dividing lines are clear: On the question of finding the right balance between slashing unneeded government spending and continuing essential functions, 43 percent side with the president, 42 percent with the GOP. While 41 percent of Americans say big cuts in federal spending are likely to spur job growth, about as many, 45 percent, say such a move is more apt to result in job losses.

[u]When it comes to dealing with issue No. 1, the economy, Obama has an advantage: 46 percent say they put more faith in the president, 34 percent say so about congressional Republicans. Obama has a similar 12-point lead on the question of who better understands the economic problems people face, and a nine-point edge on dealing with the deficit.[/u]

Among those who say a government shutdown would be harmful, about twice as many say they would hold the GOP, rather than the president, responsible. A similar question two weeks ago showed that about as many said they would blame Obama as the congressional Republicans for a such a stoppage.

On the economy, trust in the GOP among independents dropped from 42 percent in January to 29 percent in the new poll.

[b]But Obama has not greatly benefited from that decline. Majorities — [u]including most political independents [/u]— continue to say they disapprove of the president’s performance on the economy and the budget deficit[/b].

[b]Obama’s overall approval rating stands at 51 percent, down slightly from January, with 45 percent saying they disapprove of the job he is doing. Among independents, half say they approve of the way he is conducting his presidency. Obama spent the bulk of 2010 below the 50 percent mark among this key segment[/b].

[b]About three-quarters of independents say they disapprove of the way Congress is doing its work, a figure nearly as high as it was in the fall[/b], when independents were turning out to put Republicans back in control of the House. Among all Americans, disapproval of Congress is at 69 percent, suggesting that the GOP’s majority in the House and its enhanced numbers in the Senate have done little to alter public perceptions of the institution.

[b]The president has been faulted for not taking a higher-profile leadership position on the budget, a criticism he has rejected. When people were asked [u]who they see taking a stronger leadership role in Washington[/u], 46 percent said Republicans in Congress and 39 percent named the president — [u]a tilt in the GOP’s direction since December[/u][/b].

Still, that leaves Obama in a stronger position when compared with President Bill Clinton after Democrats lost control of both houses of Congress in 1994. In the spring of 1995, two-thirds of all Americans saw congressional Republicans in the dominant leadership role.

This year, Obama also faces a divided Republican base: [u]Among self-identified Republicans and GOP-leaning independents who describe themselves as “very conservative,” 61 percent say a government shutdown would be a positive development; 58 percent of those who are less conservative or moderate disagree[/u].

This telephone poll was conducted March 10 to 13 among a random national sample of 1,005 adults. The results from the full poll have a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.


balzd@washpost.com
cohenj@washpost.com
Polling manager Peyton M. Craighill contributed to this report.


Ahi lo tienen... El effecto Giffords ya va amainando y el pueblo se da cuenta de que el emperador sigue sin tener que lo cubra...c Ademas, el "Tea Party", o sectores mas conservadores, va ganando fuerzas.

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Esto es un chiste...........

Primeramente no podemos esperar que Obama arregle en un termino el desastre republicano que duro casi una decada. Almenos Obama logro enfocarse en la guerra contra el terrorismo en resultado esta administracion hizo lo que los republicanos fracasaron, "Matar Osama".

Los republicanos no tienen candidatos a la presidencia, y no lo van a tener. Obama no es alguin facil de ganar por ende prefieren esperar el proximo termino y no competir en estas proximas elecciones,

Los republicanos del foro no quieren ver o aceptar la realidad.

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Soto, que no sabe nada:[color="#FF0000"][i]Primeramente no podemos esperar que Obama arregle en un termino el desastre republicano que duro casi una decada.[/i][/color]


Soto, del 2002 al 2007 hubo un crecimiento economico ininterrumpido pro 55 meses. El deficit de gobierno bajo los republicanos (con dos guerras y el 'Surge' en su apogeo) se redujo a 165 billones para el an~o fiscal 2006.

La recesion que empezo en el 2007 es como cualquier recesion cada 8-10 an~os. Clinton le dejo una recesion a Bush tambien en 2000-2002.


Eso si la administracion de Obama declaro terminada la recesion al final del 2009, y declaro el verano pasado 'The Summer of Recovery'. You remember that, right Soto? Of course not.


Uno no puede declarar victoria sobre algo pero continuar echandole la culpa a otros si tus propias [b]acciones anticapitalistas[/b] rehunden la economia cuando esta tratando de recobrarse. Que Obama y sus seguidores sigan culpando a Bush es como el tipo que sale por la puerta vestido de mujer todas las noches y le dice a su familia que hay otra fiesta de disfraces de la oficina. Tarde o temprano se van a dar cuenta de la realidad. Edited by Artaguito

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Sabrán los Demócratas al igual que los Populares que su cimiento es el socialismo? que el socialismo democrático es lo que mantiene sus ideales y realidades? Les digo... la historia despierta hasta a los muertos... :idontno:

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Podra el Presi salir de la picada en que se halla?

[url="http://www.gallup.com/poll/149966/Obama-September-Approval-Rating-Remains-Term-Low.aspx?version=print"]http://www.gallup.com/poll/149966/Obama-September-Approval-Rating-Remains-Term-Low.aspx?version=print[/url]





October 7, 2011
[b] Obama's September Approval Rating Remains at Term-Low 41%[/b]

[b] Obama loses disproportionate support among high-income Americans and Hispanics[/b]

by Frank Newport and Clancy Bertane

PRINCETON, NJ -- President Barack Obama's job approval rating averaged 41% in September, tied with August for the lowest monthly approval average of his administration.[center][img]http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/ilklg8i6i0qyop_k083fvw.gif[/img]
[b]Obama began his term with average approval ratings of 66% in January 2009 and 64% in February 2009. His ratings gradually drifted downward from that point, with a slight uptick in January of this year and again in May, after the killing of Osama bin Laden.[/b]
[b]Too Early to Predict Re-Election Chances Based on Approval Ratings[/b]
Thirteen months from now, Americans will vote on whether to give Obama a second term in office. While Obama's September job approval average may not appear to bode well for him, history shows that approval ratings at this juncture are not strongly predictive of an incumbent president's re-election chances. Jimmy Carter in 1979 had lower monthly average approval ratings in September of the year before his election than Obama has now. Carter went on to lose his re-election bid. George H.W. Bush's approval rating in September of 1991 was 68%, second only to Dwight Eisenhower's 71% in September 1995. Bush went on to lose the 1992 election to Bill Clinton.[/center][center][img]http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/sm-oohfyweawsvsw8n9uhq.gif[/img]
[b]A 72-Point Gap in Obama's Approval Between Liberal Dems and Conservative Republicans[/b]
President Obama's approval ratings predictably differ by party identification and ideology, ranging from a 79% approval rating among liberal Democrats to a 7% rating among conservative Republicans.[/center][center][img]http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/lcpd_hikcugecsrabbjpca.gif[/img]
[b]His current ratings among all these groups are lower now than earlier in his presidency, but he has lost proportionately more support among Republicans and less among Democrats[/b].
As a result, the approval spread among these political groups has widened during Obama's term. The accompanying chart displays these groups' average yearly approval ratings of Obama, indexed to his national average for each year. Index values above 100 indicate that the group in question gave Obama a higher rating than the national average for that year; values below 100 show that the group gave him a lower rating than the national average for that year.
Obama's indexed ratings among liberal, moderate, and conservative Democrats are proportionately higher now than in 2009, meaning these groups' ratings of the president have stayed relatively high compared with other groups over time.
[u]Moderate and conservative Republicans' indexed ratings of Obama are lower now than in 2009, meaning his ratings among these groups have declined disproportionately compared with other groups[/u]. The spread in Obama's ratings between Democrats and Republicans has thus expanded over time; therefore, political polarization has increased over the course of Obama's term so far.[/center][center][img]http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/d2czompntumyklttct3zfa.gif[/img]
[b]Blacks Give Obama His Highest Ratings; Whites, His Lowest[/b]
Obama's approval ratings vary widely across demographic groups, reflecting the general structure of partisanship in the U.S. population today. Blacks, nonwhites, those with postgraduate educations, Hispanics, young and unmarried Americans, and those living in the East were among the most approving of Obama in September.
Obama's approval ratings are below average among whites, married Americans, those aged 65 and older, and Southerners.[/center][center][img]http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/pqp6z1gywuuymcpbaju5lw.gif[/img]
[u]Blacks' indexed approval ratings of Obama have risen substantially over the last 2 ½ years, mainly because they have stayed relatively constant in the 80% range [b]while other groups' ratings have declined[/b]. Americans with postgraduate education and nonwhites also are proportionately more positive about Obama now than in 2009.[/u]
On the other hand, Obama has lost the most ground on a relative basis among Americans making at least $7,500 a month, Hispanics, and those with a high school education or less.[/center][center][img]http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/ak9kgvby006kx4jty2bwrw.gif[/img]
[b]Implications[/b]
[u][b]President Obama's monthly job approval rating remains at 41% in September, tied for the lowest monthly average of his administration[/b][/u]. His job rating will become an increasingly important predictor of his re-election chances as each month goes by, although history shows that candidates' ratings in September of the year before an election can still change significantly in the 13 months leading up to that election. [color=#ff0000][u]At this point Obama's ratings are well below the 48% to 50% approval threshold that a president generally needs to be re-elected.[/u][/color]
[b]Americans' views of Obama have become somewhat more polarized over the course of his administration to date.[/b] Democrats' ratings are now higher relative to other groups than they were in 2009, while Republicans' ratings are lower compared with other groups. Obama's support among blacks and those with postgraduate education remains high compared with the national average, while his support among high-income Americans and Hispanics has weakened.[/center]

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[quote name='Isis' timestamp='1306267492' post='2929891']
Sabrán los Demócratas al igual que los Populares que su cimiento es el socialismo? que el socialismo democrático es lo que mantiene sus ideales y realidades? Les digo... la historia despierta hasta a los muertos... :idontno:
[/quote]

querida amiga cibernetica Isis, no todos los populares son democratas o socialistas............. :sardonic:

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