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mimapr

Rick Santorum's Anal Sex Problem

27 posts in this topic

Pobre Artaguito aprovecha cualquier tema para lleva su mensaje repitido de las misma babosadas . Ya de Santorum brinco al general......dito estos republicanos/teabaggers estan locos y sin idea..... :moron:

Regresando al tema del Santorum....el dice que no escucho el boooooooo,,,, claro otro embuste de un infeliz republicano... Estos infelices tanto que diz que defienden a los militares pero cuando el militar es gay, se les sale lo de homofobico,,,,debe ser que se les moja la canoa.... :idiot:

[b][size=5]Did Rick Santorum Hear Audience Members Booing Gay Soldier? [/size][/b]

[b]By Maggie Astor [/b]| September 24, 2011 5:36 PM EDT

[size=3]

At the Republican debate on Thursday, a gay soldier asked candidate Rick Santorum via video whether he would reinstate the just-repealed "don't ask, don't tell" policy as president. [b]Several audience members booed, and none of the nine candidates on stage said anything about it.[/b]
[size=3]

It was a moment on par with the one in a previous debate in which Texas Rep. Ron Paul was asked whether an uninsured person should just be allowed to die, and several audience members shouted, "Yes!" Unlike Santorum, though, Paul made a point to rebuke the hecklers, and he deserves credit for that.
But Santorum, a former U.S. senator from [url="/topics/detail/478/pennsylvania/"]Pennsylvania[/url], just stood behind his lectern and answered Stephen Hill's question as though nothing had happened.[b] Surely if it had been a group of anti-war activists doing the heckling, he would have condemned them immediately for disrespecting an American soldier.[/b]

Santorum's silence has become a minor scandal in the past two days, and he has been forced to account for it -- which he did by claiming he didn't hear the booing and would have responded to it if he had. No one will ever know if that's true, and it could be, but it seems dubious.[/size]
[size=3]



[b]It is true that it was only a handful of people booing, but the sound carried well because of the acoustics of the room, and it was picked up by the microphones and very much audible on television. It should have been audible to the candidates as well.[/b]

Democrats are not the only ones criticizing Santorum. Jim Geraghty, a conservative writer, panned him just as badly, writing,[b] "It is troubling, and revealing, that Santorum's answer entirely defined Hill as a gay man first and as a soldier second, if at all."[/b]

Santorum's answer to the Hill's question, after the booing stopped, was strongly in favor of "don't ask, don't tell," but not overtly homophobic. He argued that "sex shouldn't be an issue" in the military, period, and that repealing "don't ask, don't tell" was a "social experiment" to give gay soldiers special rights. That's an extremely misleading argument -- the repeal doesn't give gay soldiers the right to have sex on the job; it just allows them to speak openly -- but at least he said that sex while on duty was equally inappropriate for heterosexual and homosexual soldiers.

But even so, his failure to condemn the booing audience members, who gave Hill no respect as a soldier just because he happened to be a gay soldier, was nearly as bad as making a homophobic remark himself -- and Santorum has certainly made plenty of those in his time, including comparing gay sex to pedophilia and bestiality.

After the debate, Santorum defended himself to Fox News: "I condemn the people who booed that gay soldier. That soldier is serving our country and I thank him for his service to our country. I'm sure he's doing an excellent job, I hope he's safe and returns safely and does his mission well. I have to admit, I did not hear those boos. ... If I had, I would have said, 'Don't do that, that man is serving his country and we ought to thank him for his service.'"
But when he answered Hill's question, Santorum didn't thank him for his service, either.

[/size]
[/size]

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Yo se que nosotros los 'teabaggers' somos pocos, y que por cada uno de nosotros hay muchos 'teabagees' que son diariamente 'teabagged' al otro lado.


Teabagging liberals in the face is our specialty.

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Por lo menos queda un republicano que no es manejado por los teabaggers.....y critico el booing entre otras cosas......que bueno que aun quedan hombres con conciencia propia en este partido de idiotas..... :whistle:


[media]http://youtu.be/f32rKfDy0pU[/media]


"If I have one regret from last evening, it’s that I didn’t stand up and say, you know, you’re booing a U.S. serviceman who is denied being able to express his sexual preference," he said. "There’s something very, very wrong with that."

Johnson said he was "chomping at the bit" to respond to the audience, but he was reticent to speak out due to his exclusion from the recent debates. "I’m feeling a little bit like I’m walking on egg shells," he said.

[b]He told Sharpton he believes [url="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/20/barack-obama-dont-ask-dont-tell-repeal-statement_n_971662.html"]the repeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell[/url], which went into effect on Sept. 20, should have been done "a long time ago."[/b]

Sharpton asked Johnson about the unexpected outbursts from audience members that have characterized the last three Republican debates. At the Reagan Library debate on Sept. 7, the audience [url="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/07/rick-perry-death-penalty-gop-debate_n_953214.html"]spontaneously applauded[/url] the mere mention of executions performed under the Texas governorship of Rick Perry. During the Sept. 12 CNN/Tea Party debate, Wolf Blitzer asked a hypothetical question about the fate of a sick, uninsured patient. "Are you saying society should just let him die?" Blitzer asked, provoking [url="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/12/tea-party-debate-health-care_n_959354.html"]cheers of "Yeah!"[/url] from the audience.

Johnson, agreeing with Sharpton's description of the incidents as "ugly," called himself "the different voice in that debate." He said that he views the death penalty as "flawed public policy," and he argued in favor of caring for the sick, adding that "government perhaps is the only entity that's available" for the most needy. "Let him die?[b] No, that’s not this country," he said. "We are a country of compassion.[/b] These are the people that we want to help."

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Rick is a looser...he shouldn't be wasting everybody's time running
for President..he better get a real job.....

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[quote name='Mobutu Sese' timestamp='1316961412' post='2938455']
Rick is a looser...he shouldn't be wasting everybody's time running
for President..he better get a real job.....
[/quote]


What is Rick Perry "loosing"? He has the same right to be a candidate as everyone else, and the most important thing is not to let the Democratas choose our candidate.

I don't think Rick Perry will be the nominee, he is fading fast. Even though I consider him a better conservative than Romney, Romney has more political tools in his toolbox.

[b]The goal is to get the Marxist out of the White House for the sake of this nation.[/b] Romney has great debating skills, great stage presence, great public and private experience and experience (except for RomneyCare), and way more intelligent than Obama. He needs to:

Denounce RonmeyCare as the wrong thing in the right place (socialized health care at the state level)
Pledge to repeal (not just give waivers to everyone like he's saying) ObamaCare
Reverse all the harmful regulations created by the Obama administration
Slash the budget (or at least freeze it to present levels).

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[quote name='Artaguito' timestamp='1316963730' post='2938461']


Denounce RonmeyCare as the wrong thing in the right place (socialized health care at the state level)
Pledge to repeal (not just give waivers to everyone like he's saying) ObamaCare
Reverse all the harmful regulations created by the Obama administration
Slash the budget (or at least freeze it to present levels).
[/quote]

JAJAJAJAJAJAJA que pindijo jajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajjaa

Lo de gringo no te sale pitiyanqui

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[quote name='napoleon888' timestamp='1316966890' post='2938464']

JAJAJAJAJAJAJA que pindijo jajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajajjaa

Lo de gringo no te sale pitiyanqui
[/quote]


Acuerdate que el Ingles que yo aprendí en Puerto Rico es mejor que el que tu estas todavía aprendiendo en la Saguesera.

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    • mimapr
      Birth Control As Election Issue? Why?
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      No se porque los republicanos conservadores se preocupan tanto por los anticonceptivos y no se preocupan por tantos curas pedofilos que abusan de los nenes.....eso esta permitido en la biblia? Estos idiotas ya cansan!! Yo le propongo a estos republicanos idiotas que para que las mujeres no se embarazen que los hombres desde jovencitos les hagan una vasectomia sino que se lo corten....asi no se tienen que preocupar tanto por los asuntos de las mujeres....


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    • mimapr
      Evangelical Leaders Back Santorum
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      [size=6][b] Evangelical leaders back Santorum[/b][/size]





      [img]http://snsimages.tribune.com/media/photo/2012-01/67377587.jpg[/img]
      Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum attends a campaign event at Tommy's Country Ham House in Greenville (ERIC THAYER, REUTERS / January 14, 2012)
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