Bienvenidos a CafeBoricua!

Bienvenidos a CafeBoricua.com,  Un foro donde se discute la Politica Boricua aparte de otros temas de actualidad e interes.  Aqui existe la mayor libertad de expresion donde pueden debatir libremente.  Registrate!

 
Como la mayoria de las comunidades en linea necesita registrarse para poder postear en nuestra comunidad, pero no se preocupe esto es un proceso simple que solo requiere minima informacion. Sea parte de Cafe Boricua creando una cuenta con nosotros.  Puede logearse con su cuenta de Facebook o Twitter.

  • Comienze nuevos temas y responda a otros
  • Subscribirse a temas y foros y recibir actualizaciones automaticas.
  • Crea su propio perfil y haga nuevas amistades.
  • Comparta sus posteos o temas en las redes sociales.
  • Personalize su experiencia aqui.
  • Crea una encuesta!   Una gallery de fotos.  Anuncie un evento. 

Animate a participar en nuestro foro boricua!


Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mimapr

Hospitals Continue To Shut Down In Rural America

12 posts in this topic

 
Hospitals continue to shut down in rural America

When states opt out of Medicaid expansion, many rural communities soon find their local emergency rooms shuttered.

July 12, 2014 12:00AM ET

When Pungo Hospital, the only emergency health facility in Belhaven, North Carolina, closed its doors earlier this July, barely anyone outside this coastal community took notice. But for the town’s mayor, Adam O’Neal, the shutdown was a matter of life and death.

“Our health and well-being depend on this hospital,” O’Neal said, as he was gearing up for a town council meeting.

Pungo Hospital provided health services to 25,000 people in two of North Carolina’s poorest counties, Beaufort and Hyde. Vidant Health, a nonprofit network that owns hospitals and clinics in eastern North Carolina, decided to replace Pungo with a 24/7 urgent care clinic offering treatment for minor illnesses and non-life threatening injuries. If the clinic cannot serve their needs, Belhaven residents will now have to travel 30 miles to the next closest hospital.

image.img.png
On July 1, Pungo Hospital in Belhaven, North Carolina, closed, leaving the town's more than 1,500 residents a 30-minute drive away from a proper emergency room.Eric Byler/StoryofAmerica.org

This can be problematic. “If someone is having a stroke, it's probably not good to have another half-hour drive before you can get treatment,” O’Neal said.

But it turns out that Belhaven’s experience is far from unique.

Across the country, many rural hospitals are closing down, according to the National Rural Health Association. In 2013 alone, 14 rural hospitals shut down nationwide, leaving whole communities without quick access to emergency care.

That’s not just a healthcare problem; it is an economic issue too. In addition to healthcare services, research shows rural hospitals contribute significantly to local economies. They bring outside dollars into rural communities and stimulate local purchasing power while they help attract industry and, in some locales, a steady flow of retirees.

The 50-bed Pungo Hospital was the largest employer in the predominantly African-American community of Belhaven. It represented roughly 10 percent of the funds the town received each year by providing utilities such as electricity to its residents and businesses, said Town Manager Guinn Leverett. Belhaven is now considering raising property taxes by 10 percent to make up the loss of that revenue.

While there seems to be consensus that the increasing rate of hospital closures in rural America is alarming, there isn’t much agreement on the causes. Some health experts say it’s the fallout of health care’s transition from a cost-based model to pay-for-performance, which aims to improve the quality and outcomes while lowering costs. But many others put the blame on shifting demographics, sharp cuts to federal reimbursements, dwindling numbers of insured patients and congressional gridlock in Washington, D.C.

The closure of Pungo Hospital is in part due to North Carolina’s refusal to expand Medicaid, Vidant Health said in a statement. Other considerations, including the failing state of the 60-year-old facility also contributed to the decision to close it. The hospital ran close to a $1.8 million deficit last year—although it’s unclear what caused the shortfall. Repeated attempts to contact Vidant about the deficit went unanswered.

image.img.png
The sign placed outside Pungo Hospital when it closed on July 1.Eric Byler/StoryofAmerica.org

Like other rural hospitals across the country, Pungo had long relied on subsidies to facilities serving areas with high numbers of Medicaid patients and uninsured people to make up for the dwindling number of patients staying overnight and for the rising cost of providing services to indigent patients. However, now that President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (ACA) has gone into effect, those funds will be significantly reduced. At the time of the bill’s passage, health officials assumed that millions of uninsured Americans would gain coverage through the new law or through expanded state Medicaid programs.

But as portrayed in this week’s episode of Fault Lines, “The Coverage Gap,” North Carolina is one of 21 states that have so far opted not to expand Medicaid, thereby turning down millions of dollars annually in federal funds. States that don't expand Medicaid will miss out on a total of $88 billion through 2016, according to a July 2 report from the White House Council of Economic Advisers.

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory's refusal to expand Medicaid was made possible by a Supreme Court ruling that gave states the option to opt out. The ACA allows states to expand their Medicaid programs to anyone whose income is below 138 percent of the federal poverty level, which is currently just over $15,000 for a single person. Despite the federal government offering to cover the cost of newly eligible enrollees through 2016 (and 90 percent of their costs thereafter), Republican governors, including McCrory, argue that expansion would be too costly for their states in the long run.

States’ decisions to opt out of the expansion have put tremendous pressure on rural hospitals, said Christopher Coleman of the Tennessee Justice Center. In his home state, 28 rural hospitals face major budget cuts or closure. Many have already cut down on services and significantly reduced staff.

For instance, Haywood Park Community Hospital in Brownsville, Tennessee, announced in April that it would end inpatient and emergency room services on July 31 because of the state’s failure to expand Medicaid coverage. The 62-bed west Tennessee hospital will become an urgent care clinic. This will leave virtually all of Haywood County’s nearly 19,000 residents without access to a local emergency room. The nearest ER will be 25 miles away in the town of Jackson.

image.img.png
Protestors in Atlanta vilify Georgia Governor Nathan Deal for his decision not to have the state participate in Medicaid expansion.Martin Asturias for Al Jazeera America

Coleman warned that if the state continues to reject Medicaid expansion, more hospitals will close, ultimately leaving several other Tennessee counties without hospitals.

In Georgia, which also is not expanding Medicaid, four of its 65 rural hospitals have shut down over the past two years. As many as 15 more may be closing due to shrinking budgets and razor-thin government reimbursements, according to Hometown Health, a trade association that represents 56 hospitals in rural Georgia.

In Alabama, six rural hospitals have closed in the past 18 months and 22 more are facing serious financial shortfalls. Meanwhile, the state’s Republican governor, Robert Bentley, continues to reject the expansion of Medicaid.

Back in Belhaven, Mayor O’Neal said he wants to see Pungo Hospital reopen immediately “…to save lives.”

O’Neal is now planning to walk the 273 miles from Belhaven to Washington, D.C., beginning on July 14, to “raise awareness about rural hospital closures in America.” He is determined to take his message to lawmakers in D.C., whom he said have failed to adequately address the healthcare issue in rural America because of partisanship.

“When the issue is vetted, and people know all about this issue, there aren’t a lot of common sense reasons not to accept expansions of Medicaid,” he said.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

AYYYYYYYYYYY....PERDON ...PENSE   QUE   AHBIA  INCRESADO  A  UN  FORO  AMERICUCHIIII........ :hysterical: NO  ENTIENDO   NI  PAPA..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Esto es un asunto económico más que otra cosa, si un hospital no puede mantenerse económicamente como cualquier negocio entonces debe desaparecer. El pueblito con una población de 25,000 personas no puede sostener un hospital. Si puede tener una lcinica donde estabilizan al paciente y lo envían a un hospital.

Es el mismo caso de Maunabo, Yabucoa o cualquier otro pueblito en el territorio que corren para Humacao y de ahí a centro médico.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Claro recordemos que Pedro el ladron vendio los CDT a quemazon y jodio el sistema de salud de la isla,,,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Claro recordemos que Pedro el ladron vendio los CDT a quemazon y jodio el sistema de salud de la isla,,,

Ay Dona Mima... veamos lo que su fanatism le dice......

Los CDT nunca, pero que nunca han sido estándares de eficiencia y calidad....ahi uno va a que le

den un referido a Centro Medico o a que lo declaren muerto, nada mas. 

Pero vayamos a la realidad de los servicios de salud gracias a su líder máximo Barack...si ese mismito,

el que al igual que Paco Tilla, es un desastre.

La vamos a educar con un ejemplo simple..... usted y Mister Magoo se compran un hospital de 50-100 camas en 

Worcester.  Usted como patriota y demócrata que es acepta todo tipo de seguro medico incluyendo Medicaid, Medicare, Obamacare

y todo lo que se aparezca y como es una santa, da servicios gratis a todos los nuevos ilegales que gracias a su Barack se les ha

dado asilo, no para trabajar pero si para depender del gobierno ( demócratas 100%). Su amor por la democracia es tal que usted

insiste en que las enfermeras, las secretarias, todo el mundo EXCEPTO los medicos tengan una union y si algo piden se los da.

Por supuesto, usted también quiere que su hospital  provea los mejores servicios y se compre dos MRI's, equipo para

hacer cirugía robotica y de corazón. Y ahi no se queda eso, también logra que su hospital sea denominado Centro de Trauma. 

Inaugura el hospital con tremenda celebración, hasta Marc Anthony, Barack y Daval Patrick se aparecen a celebrar  el nuevo

hospital Latino...New England Latin and Salsa Medical Center. Pero que pasa......a fin de mes la llama su Chief Financial Officer

para decirle que los gastos son de  tres a cinco veces mayores que los ingresos. No hay dinero para papel de inodoro, ni para pagar la luz, ni mantener el equipo, ni poder comprar medicinas, ni para pagar los seguros, ni la comida de la cafeteria , ni el lavado de sabanas.

Usted se va al banco ( y no es el Banco de Sangre ni de Esperma)  y pide un préstamo, por varios meses paga el interés pero no puede pagar el principal. Mientras tanto sigue aumentando su deficit. A fin de cuentas se va a la quiebra pues lo que le pagan por prestar sus servicios es mucho menos de lo que le cuesta proveer el servicio. Usted llama a los líderes latinos, hispanos, etc. para que la ayuden y estos le dicen..para "eso no hay dinero". Se va a Boston y le dice lo mismo a Daval, el le dice: " My dear Mima, such is life".

Asi que cierra su hospital. A quien le va a echar la culpa?

Edited by Mobutu Sese

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

El viejo sistema de CDT's  estaba arcaico, se cambió por la tarjetita, para mal o para bien, pero NADIE se atrevió a cambiarlo después que se aprobó y tiempo hubo, porque será?

 

Los sistemas dejan de funcionar, cuando los políticos interfieren, buscando sacar provecho para su partido y para sus tretas políticas, que nada tienen que ver con la salud del pueblo y solo la perjudican.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
El viejo sistema de CDT's  estaba arcaico, se cambió por la tarjetita, para mal o para bien, pero NADIE se atrevió a cambiarlo después que se aprobó y tiempo hubo, porque será?

 

Los sistemas dejan de funcionar, cuando los políticos interfieren, buscando sacar provecho para su partido y para sus tretas políticas, que nada tienen que ver con la salud del pueblo y solo la perjudican.

El problema del CDT en Macondo es mas profundo.....es un problema de recursos, de liderato, de establecer estandares, de monitoreo, de

control de calidad, de tener el personal adecuado y entrenado.... Al CDT no le importa el seguro pues todos trabajan a sueldo ( aunque así ocurre también en muchos hospitales privados). Asi

que no tienen incentivos para mejorar...aparte de que sin recursos ..como mejorar?  EL país, en general, sus politicos

y propios ciudadanos no entienden/comprenden/conocen la importancia de un CDT moderno y eficiente. Nunca lo han entendido

y no lo van a entender  ahora.  Tal parece es mas importante la construcción de una cancha de baloncesto o la celebración del Festival del

Salchichon que mejorar CDT alguno...asi es la mentalidad isleña. Inclusive la gran Chulin no lo entiende.

Lo quieren arreglar? Creen una ley donde todo miembro de la Legislocura y su familia  tengan que utilizar los servicios de los CDT's.

Edited by Mobutu Sese

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
El problema del CDT en Macondo es mas profundo.....es un problema de recursos, de liderato, de establecer estandares, de monitoreo, de

control de calidad, de tener el personal adecuado y entrenado.... Al CDT no le importa el seguro pues todos trabajan a sueldo ( aunque así ocurre también en muchos hospitales privados). Asi

que no tienen incentivos para mejorar...aparte de que sin recursos ..como mejorar?  EL país, en general, sus politicos

y propios ciudadanos no entienden/comprenden/conocen la importancia de un CDT moderno y eficiente. Nunca lo han entendido

y no lo van a entender  ahora.  Tal parece es mas importante la construcción de una cancha de baloncesto o la celebración del Festival del

Salchichon que mejorar CDT alguno...asi es la mentalidad isleña. Inclusive la gran Chulin no lo entiende.

Primeros nosotros y nuestro partido, lo que sobre para el pueblo, así piensan los políticos, muchos puertoriqueños no entienden nada de eso.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Bastante que fui al CDT de Orocovis, ya que el hospital mas cerca que nos quedaba estaba en Aibonito, luego hicieron uno en Manati. claro los que vivian en el area metropolitana no necesitaban in CDT tenian hospitales donde quiera. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Bastante que fui al CDT de Orocovis, ya que el hospital mas cerca que nos quedaba estaba en Aibonito, luego hicieron uno en Manati. claro los que vivian en el area metropolitana no necesitaban in CDT tenian hospitales donde quiera. 

Mima, en Rio Piedras había un CDT, en la Barbosa había otro en la entrada del residencial Manuel A Pérez, otro en parcelas Falú, en fin estaban cerca de hospitales pero eran usados por personas que no tenían planes médicos. En los pueblos distantes acudían al CDT y de ahí eran referidos a hospitales de ser necesario. El problema con los CDT's de Rio Piedras era que no tenían el personal adecuado ni las medicinas para tratar a los pacientes que les llegaban. Se llegó a comentar que la policía cuando cogían un asesino herido lo llevaban al CDT para que allí muriera, la gente acá les decían mataderos. Fueron realidades de otros tiempos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Pues el CDT en Orocovis era muy bueno...mas cuando uno tiene nenes pequeños y quieren que atiendan a un hijo lo mas pronto posible no tenerlo que lleva por una hora a otro hospital.   Por eso digo que en area metro quizas no se necesitaban tantos CDTs porque habian otros medios.   Pero nosotros no teniamos esa opcion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Pues el CDT en Orocovis era muy bueno...mas cuando uno tiene nenes pequeños y quieren que atiendan a un hijo lo mas pronto posible no tenerlo que lleva por una hora a otro hospital.   Por eso digo que en area metro quizas no se necesitaban tantos CDTs porque habian otros medios.   Pero nosotros no teniamos esa opcion.

Si así es, en los pueblos funcionaban diferente, aparte, que en los pueblos la gente se conoce y la atención era bien diferente a la de acá en San Juan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0