Bienvenidos a CafeBoricua!

Bienvenidos a CafeBoricua.com,  Un foro donde se discute la Politica Boricua aparte de otros temas de actualidad e interes.  Aqui existe la mayor libertad de expresion donde pueden debatir libremente.  Registrate!

 
Como la mayoria de las comunidades en linea necesita registrarse para poder postear en nuestra comunidad, pero no se preocupe esto es un proceso simple que solo requiere minima informacion. Sea parte de Cafe Boricua creando una cuenta con nosotros.  Puede logearse con su cuenta de Facebook o Twitter.

  • Comienze nuevos temas y responda a otros
  • Subscribirse a temas y foros y recibir actualizaciones automaticas.
  • Crea su propio perfil y haga nuevas amistades.
  • Comparta sus posteos o temas en las redes sociales.
  • Personalize su experiencia aqui.
  • Crea una encuesta!   Una gallery de fotos.  Anuncie un evento. 

Animate a participar en nuestro foro boricua!


Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Te lo dije

Both Parties See Campaign Tilting To Republicans

61 posts in this topic

Both Parties See Campaign Tilting to Republicans

By JONATHAN MARTIN

NOV. 1, 2014
 
Photo
JP-MIDTERM-master675.jpg
 
The race for an open Senate seat in Georgia, which pits Michelle Nunn, a Democrat, against David Perdue, a Republican, is one of many that remain tight and could decide which party controls the chamber next year. Credit David Tulis/Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Republicans entered the final weekend before the midterm elections clearly holding the better hand to control the Senate and poised to add to their House majority. But a decidedly sour electorate and a sizable number of undecided voters added a measure of suspense.

 

The final drama surrounded the Senate, which has been a Democratic bulwark for President Obama since his party lost its House majority in 2010. Republicans need to gain six seats to seize the Senate, and officials in both parties believe there is a path for them to win at least that many.

 

Yet the races for a number of seats that will decide the majority remained close, polls showed, prompting Republicans to pour additional money into get-out-the-vote efforts in Alaska, Georgia and Iowa. Democrats were doing the same in Colorado, where they were concerned because groups that tend to favor Republicans voted early in large numbers, and in Iowa.

 

While an air of mystery hung over no fewer than nine Senate races, the only question surrounding the House was how many seats Republicans would add. If they gain a dozen seats, it will give them an advantage not seen since 1948 and potentially consign the Democrats to minority status until congressional redistricting in the 2020s.

 

According to forecasts by The Upshot, a New York Times website for politics, policy and economics, Republicans have a 70 percent chance of gaining a majority in the Senate. The outlook for each race:

 

In a sign of a worsening climate, Democratic officials shifted money to incumbents in once-safe districts around Las Vegas and Santa Barbara, Calif. And over the weekend, they put more money toward television ads in districts held by Democrats in Iowa and Minnesota, including that of longtime Representative Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota. Though there are fewer competitive House seats than in past elections because of gerrymandering, party strategists were still airing ads in 40 districts.

 

“It’s a grim environment,” said Representative Steve Israel of New York, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Mr. Israel was spending the weekend pleading with his caucus to contribute to imperiled colleagues to minimize losses. Trying to soften the blow, he noted that losses were expected: The party in control of the White House has lost an average of 29 seats in midterm elections in the last century.

 

Just two years after he won a second term by a commanding margin, Mr. Obama has kept his distance from the most pivotal congressional races. On Saturday, he was to address a heavily African-American crowd in Detroit to bolster Michigan’s Democratic nominee for governor.

 

Senate Republicans are confident. A senior party official called Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the minority leader, on Saturday at his Louisville home and, after running through voting projections, told Mr. McConnell that he would be the next majority leader. Mr. McConnell’s initial reaction was only a long pause.

 

Republican hopes were lifted by a new Des Moines Register poll Saturday showing Joni Ernst, their Iowa Senate nominee, taking a seven-point lead in a race for a Democratic-held seat. Yet, the lead is within the poll’s margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

 

But Republicans conceded that voters were hardly embracing them. “It’s not as though people have all a sudden fallen in love with Republicans,” said Senator John Cornyn of Texas, the second-ranking Senate Republican. “It’s just a loss of confidence in the administration. It’s national security, personal security and job security. People are on edge. And that’s not good if you’re the party in power.”

 

Other Republicans were restrained in their predictions for Tuesday, given the large number of undecided voters in key Senate races, growing questions about the reliability of polling and respect for the Democrats’ ability to turn out voters.

 

“We have seen how money, big data and enhanced turnout operations can impact the actual result compared to a poll, but I believe the Democrats will largely lose the Romney states in play and lose the Senate,” said Bill McInturff, a longtime Republican pollster.

 

The National Republican Senatorial Committee held a conference call Friday with lawyers and aides to candidates in close races to discuss potential recounts. It will have a chartered jet waiting on Tuesday to fly wherever a contest is close enough to be disputed.

 

Midterm Elections 2014 midterms-promo-image-thumbWide.jpg

The latest news, analysis and election results for the 2014 midterm campaign.

 

Democrats said they hoped the uncertainty would resolve in their favor. “In most elections, by two days beforehand, you can sort of tell what’s going to happen; you can feel the winds blowing,” said Senator Charles E. Schumer, Democrat of New York. “This one is real close, and there are countervailing forces on both sides.”

 

That was evident in the races for governor as well, with Republicans on the offensive in some liberal states but struggling to defend some of their incumbents in conservative-leaning states.

 

With only 27 percent of Americans saying the country is headed in the right direction, according to a CBS News poll released last week, voters are in an angst-ridden mood that is cutting against the Democrats.

 

Keith Wilson, 59, a Republican from suburban Denver who said he had sometimes supported Democrats, has already sent in his ballot. He voted for the Republicans and said he viewed the election as a referendum on the White House.

 

“It’s a real nervous time that we’re having,” Mr. Wilson said, ticking off the country’s problems and skewering the president. “It’s like everything is a reaction, instead of pro-action.” But as he sat at a Denver cafe, he made it clear that his vote was no endorsement of the Republicans. “I took the best of the two evils,” he said.

 

Representative David E. Price, Democrat of North Carolina and a political scientist, said: “People aren’t yet feeling economically secure. And you pile onto that this incredible list of international crises and the concerted Republican effort to hang those problems around the president’s neck, and you have your explanation.”

 

In their closing ads, some Republicans sought to leverage this unease.

David Perdue, the Republican candidate for the open Senate seat in Georgia, sought to link his opponent, Michelle Nunn, to Mr. Obama with an ad showing them together below an image of people in hazmat suits. A narrator warned of “terrorism and Ebola coming at us from overseas.”

 

The Georgia race illustrates why Republicans’ prospects for taking over the Senate are good, but not certain. While Ms. Nunn has run a strong race, the seat — held by Senator Saxby Chambliss, a Republican who is retiring — is likely to be decided in a January runoff, as neither she nor Mr. Perdue is expected to receive a majority on Tuesday.

 

But as the two parties prepared for their final push, thousands of votes had already been cast. In Morrow, Ga., an Atlanta suburb, Alonzo Jackson said Friday afternoon that weeks of radio ads and a sense of history had helped him “commit.” He voted for Democrats.

 

In Louisiana, Senator Mary L. Landrieu, a Democrat, will almost certainly face Representative Bill Cassidy in a runoff in December. nd in Kansas, Senator Pat Roberts, a Republican, is facing the most difficult re-election campaign of his 18 years in the chamber. Trying to fend off Greg Orman, an independent, Mr. Roberts began airing a radio ad over the weekend that attacked his opponent but also bowed to his own low standing among Kansans.

 

“Pat Roberts isn’t perfect, but at least I know where he stands,” a woman said in the commercial.

Beyond these wild cards, control of the Senate rests mostly in the hands of Democratic incumbents in Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, New Hampshire and North Carolina.

 

“It is a tough year, everyone knows that, but the fact that these candidates are still hanging in there is a tribute to their strength,” said Senator Amy Klobuchar, Democrat of Minnesota.

 

Privately, though, Democrats were increasingly worried about Senator Mark Pryor of Arkansas and Senator Mark Udall of Colorado. If they lose and Republicans win an open seat in Iowa or defeat Senator Mark Begich of Alaska, that will be enough for the Republicans to capture the majority, provided they hold their other seats and take, as they are expected to do, seats held by Democrats in Montana, South Dakota and West Virginia.

 

And things do not seem to be getting better for Democrats.

 

“It is hard to say the situation has improved in the last couple of days,” acknowledged Mark Mellman, a Democratic pollster.

 

Senate Democrats’ best hope may be their field organization. In the last week, volunteers and staff members have knocked on 1.1 million doors and made 2.6 million phone calls, according to party officials.

 

House Democrats, however, have slipped among many independents and older voters in recent weeks.

 

“It’s very tough terrain,” Mr. Israel acknowledged.

 

Julie Turkewitz contributed reporting from Denver, Alan Blinder from Atlanta, and Jeremy W. Peters from Washington.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Yo casi nunca voto en estas elecciones pero el marte voy de cabeza , ademas he entusiasmado a varias personas a ir.  Veremos que pasa.

 

Hay que recordar que especialmente en los estados del sur y republicanos han puesto muchisimas restricciones para que la minoria no pueda votar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Yo casi nunca voto en estas elecciones pero el marte voy de cabeza , ademas he entusiasmado a varias personas a ir.  Veremos que pasa.

 

Hay que recordar que especialmente en los estados del sur y republicanos han puesto muchisimas restricciones para que la minoria no pueda votar.

Y claramente, no tienes que decirnos por que candidato votarás.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Le quedan horas al HR 2000

Si los republikkkanos ganan el control del Senado, y ya tienen el de la Camara

Tendra pierlooser la fuerza de cara de radicar otro proyecto?

 

Ahhh..... es que el hijo de Ali Baba dice que van a implantar en Plan Tenesi

El plan Tenesi

Jajajajajajajajajaja

 

Le van a meter 51 patadas por sus lindos traseros si se meten en el Congreso

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Le quedan horas al HR 2000

Si los republikkkanos ganan el control del Senado, y ya tienen el de la Camara

Tendra pierlooser la fuerza de cara de radicar otro proyecto?

 

Ahhh..... es que el hijo de Ali Baba dice que van a implantar en Plan Tenesi

El plan Tenesi

Jajajajajajajajajaja

 

Le van a meter 51 patadas por sus lindos traseros si se meten en el Congreso

:ontopic:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Adiooo pero de que :cono:  estamos hablando?

 

Este martes hay elecciones congresionales en USA 

Y si los Republikkkanos ganan el control del Senado

Controlaran ambas Camaras

Y cualquier gestion para adelantar la estadidad se puede ir al

Car.............ibe Hilton

jejejejejeje

BTW Es un congreso nuevo y debes saber bien que un congreso no ata a otro congreso

Y sabes lo que le pasa a los proyectos que se quedaron?

 

 

 

PS  No estoy hablando del Aureola Borealis ni del rumor de las aguas en las quebradas limpidas

Ni estoy discutiendo con Payasin

Pero si el resultado de esa eleccion no tiene consecuencias en Puerto Rico entonces no se de que $@*@#% hablar entonces

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Adiooo pero de que   estamos hablando?

 

Este martes hay elecciones congresionales en USA 

Y si los Republikkkanos ganan el control del Senado

Controlaran ambas Camaras

Y cualquier gestion para adelantar la estadidad se puede ir al

Car.............ibe Hilton

jejejejejeje

BTW Es un congreso nuevo y debes saber bien que un congreso no ata a otro congreso

Y sabes lo que le pasa a los proyectos que se quedaron?

 

 

 

PS  No estoy hablando del Aureola Borealis ni del rumor de las aguas en las quebradas limpidas

Ni estoy discutiendo con Payasin

Pero si el resultado de esa eleccion no tiene consecuencias en Puerto Rico entonces no se de que $@*@#% hablar entonces

:nobody: y mejor para ti, así nunca llegará la estadidad a PR, tranquilo...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Si ganan ambas camaras los republicanos, entonces, aquién le echaran la culpa los brutos del pnp?. A los cabilderos del ppd ajaja, a pierlooser o aquién.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Si ganan ambas camaras los republicanos, entonces, aquién le echaran la culpa los brutos del pnp?. A los cabilderos del ppd ajaja, a pierlooser o aquién.

Al primero que se les ocurra como siempre....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Demócratas temen ser castigados por el voto hispano

 

Por la falta de una reforma migratoria

 

Por Agencia EFE

election.jpg_thumbnail0_1.jpg
Con los sondeos en contra, el Partido Demócrata lucha para mantener la poca ventaja de 55-45 en la Cámara Alta y el apoyo de la comunidad latina, que se ha ido desvaneciendo pese a su fiel y amplio respaldo en los comicios de 2008 y 2012 al presidente del país, Barack Obama. (AP)
 

Miami- Los demócratas se enfrentan hoy con miedo a unas elecciones legislativas en las que no solo pueden perder la mayoría en el Senado, sino ser castigados por el voto o la abstención de ocho millones de hispanos frustrados por la falta de una reforma migratoria.

 

Con los sondeos en contra, el Partido Demócrata lucha para mantener la poca ventaja de 55-45 en la Cámara Alta y el apoyo de la comunidad latina, que se ha ido desvaneciendo pese a su fiel y amplio respaldo en los comicios de 2008 y 2012 al presidente del país, Barack Obama.

 

Tras más de un año de inacción en el tema migratorio por parte de Obama y el Congreso, los analistas temen una fuerte abstención de los votantes hispanos registrados, los cuales han reducido su respaldo tanto a candidatos demócratas como republicanos desde los comicios legislativos de 2010.

 

Esa desafección hacia las filas demócratas ha sido del 65 % al 57 %, mientras que entre los republicanos disminuyó del 28 % al 22 %, según una encuesta reciente del centro hispano Pew.

 

El partido en el Gobierno, no obstante, mantiene en ese sentido una amplia ventaja sobre la oposición conservadora, que ha mostrado una dura línea en el tema migratorio en el Congreso.

 

Sin embargo, los republicanos son optimistas con los sondeos que favorecen su objetivo de conquistar al menos seis asientos más en el Senado y arrebatarle así la mayoría a los demócratas.

 

Estados Unidos, que renueva hoy una tercera parte de los 100 senadores de la nación, dos por cada estado, tendrá especialmente los ojos puestos en Kansas, Luisiana, Iowa, New Hampshire, Alaska, Carolina del Norte, Colorado y Georgia, estos tres últimos estados con una influencia latina que podría ser vital a la hora de definir resultados en estas regiones con contiendas apretadas.

 

Cerca de 25 millones de hispanos podrán ejercer su derecho al voto, pero la tradicional abstención de esta comunidad en las elecciones legislativas prevé que tan sólo 7.8 millones de electores se acerquen finalmente a las urnas, que aún así será un 17,8 % más que en 2010.

 

La popularidad de Obama ya se desplomó entre los latinos en septiembre cuando pospuso para después de estas elecciones su promesa de poner en marcha medidas ejecutivas para aliviar la situación de los inmigrantes ante el obstruccionismo de los republicanos en el Congreso.

 

Obama, quien había prometido en su campaña una reforma migratoria para sacar de las sombras a por lo menos 11 millones de indocumentados, ha pasado ahora a ser llamado el "Deportador en Jefe" por el récord de al menos 2.3 millones de inmigrantes deportados durante su mandato.

 

La inmigración ha sido usada en campañas estatales, como en Colorado, donde el republicano Cory Gardner, quien busca reemplazar al senador demócrata Mark Udall, acudió en ayuda del excongresista antiinmigrante Tom Tancredo para alentar el voto entre el ala más conservadora del estado.

 

Otra contienda ajustada vive Carolina del Norte, un estado que cuenta con un electorado latino del 2,2 % y que enfrenta a la senadora demócrata Kay Hagan con el republicano Thom Tillis.

 

Hagan ha sido, sin embargo, considerada una "enemiga de los inmigrantes", según organizaciones latinas que la criticaron por su falta de apoyo a los estudiantes indocumentados y a las licencias de conducir para estos inmigrantes.

 

En Georgia, aunque se prevé que puede irse a una segunda vuelta en enero de 2015, los latinos, con el 9 % de la población y el 4 % del electorado, también pueden definir la elección entre la demócrata Michelle Nunn y el republicano David Perdue, para reemplazar al republicano Saxby Chambliss, que se retira.

 

Por otro lado, en Kansas, con el 6.1 % del electorado, los latinos podrían desequilibrar la balanza, que actualmente otorga una ventaja al candidato independiente Greg Orman frente al senador republicano Pat Roberts, en una pelea que sin embargo pueden cambiar los indecisos.

 

Ambos partidos, conscientes de la necesidad de decantar ciertas elecciones, optaron este año por acercarse más a la comunidad hispana con debates en español y sobre los temas que importan a esta minoría que representa el 17 % del total de la población.

Edited by Te lo dije

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Ya veran las sorpresas......Yo ya mismo a votar....por Martha Coakley......#StayCalmvotedem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Ya veran las sorpresas......Yo ya mismo a votar....por Martha Coakley......#StayCalmvotedem

A la tarde veremos, pero, si se esperan sorpresas, según la prensa televisiva, nos enteramos hoy mismo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Claro pero tarde , porque los colegios cierran a las 8pm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Claro pero tarde , porque los colegios cierran a las 8pm.

Si, pero como los votos no los cuentan tachando palitos, llll,  y lo hacen con sistemas computarizados se sabe hoy mismo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
11:30 AM ET
 

7 cosas que seguramente ocurrirán en la noche electoral

 

Por Z. Byron Wolf

 

Washington (CNN) — Feliz jornada electoral, Estados Unidos. Las cosas han cambiado desde la última vez que todos acudieron a las urnas. En aquel momento, Barack Obama fue reelegido para un segundo mandato de cuatro años. Ahora, su partido en gran medida lo ha mandado a la banca, y ha pasado menos tiempo en la campaña que su esposa, la primera dama Michelle Obama, quien es mucho más popular, el ex presidente Bill Clinton y la posible candidata presidencial Hillary Clinton. Las elecciones intermedias son asuntos más locales y los temas varían en cada contienda.

 

Pero dichas elecciones tienen consecuencias nacionales, y lo que ocurra el martes ayudará a determinar lo que el presidente Obama puede hacer en sus últimos dos años de gobierno. Preparará la próxima contienda presidencial de 2016 y les dará a los estadounidenses la posibilidad de probar un Partido Republicano más poderoso a medida que empiezan a pensar en quién debería ser el próximo presidente.

 

Pero primero viene el martes y esto es lo que va a suceder:

 

#1 – Habrá una sorpresa. Una de las cosas que incluimos en esta lista no sucederá al final. Ésta es una elección y aún no ha terminado. Los votantes son inconstantes, las encuestas no son perfectas y las predicciones mucho menos. Así que sintoniza CNN Politics todo el día y la noche del martes. Estaremos aquí y será emocionante.

 

141104095536-cnnee-valdes-us-vote-minimu

#2 – La mayoría de estadounidenses no participará. En serio, el martes va a ser emocionante. Pero la mayoría de estadounidenses no habrá participado en las elecciones. Más o menos entre el 55% y el 65% de los estadounidenses idóneos votan en una elección presidencial (aproximadamente 130 millones de personas en 2012). Muchos menos estadounidenses, entre el 39% y el 42%, participan en las elecciones intermedias (aproximadamente 90 millones en 2010). Un reciente grupo de discusión conformado por mamás y llevado a cabo por un grupo afiliado a Walmart sugirió que ellas decidirían su voto al buscar en Google información sobre los candidatos la noche anterior. El entusiasmo de los votantes ha disminuido desde 2010, cuando se llevaron a cabo las últimas elecciones intermedias, según la encuesta más reciente de CNN/ORC. Esa encuesta también sugirió que los votantes están molestos con el proceso político y con Washington, D.C., ya sea porque ven que sus votos no están logrando cambios o porque consideran que el actual bloqueo de Washington no tiene solución. De cualquier forma, es probable que menos de la mitad de la población idónea se presente y emita su voto en estas elecciones.

 

#3 – Los demócratas perderán el Senado. Bien, esto no es seguro. Y al menos el vicepresidente Biden sigue diciendo que los demócratas mantendrán la mayoría en el Senado el martes. Pero todo indica que el Partido Republicano ganará escaños, y lo más probable es que sean suficientes como para tener una ligera mayoría en el Senado. Los republicanos necesitan ganar seis escaños para tener mayoría en el Senado. En tres escaños que durante mucho tiempo fueron ocupados por demócratas que se están jubilando o ya lo han hecho, hay un republicano como gran favorito: Dakota del Sur, Virginia Occidental y Montana. Entre el resto de las contiendas en las que CNN considera que las probabilidades son de cincuenta-cincuenta o que el favorito es el Partido Republicano, 7 de ellas están en poder de los demócratas. Los republicanos solo ocupan tres de ellas. Los republicanos han acabado con la mayoría de los demócratas en cada elección desde que los demócratas tuvieron una mayoría a prueba de obstruccionismo cuando el presidente Obama fue elegido por primera vez en 2008.

 

#4 – Los republicanos elegirán a un senador afroamericano en el sur. Tim Scott ya es senador. Fue nombrado después de que el senador Jim DeMint se retirara del cargo para dirigir una organización de investigación del Partido Republicano. Así que será pasado por alto como un momento histórico el martes por la noche, pero cuando gane la contienda (es un gran favorito), Scott se convertirá en el primer afroamericano en ser elegido como senador en el sur, y solo el quinto afroamericano en ser elegido para el Senado en la historia. La elección de Scott, si bien es histórica, no se espera que cambie el hecho de que las minorías generalmente apoyan a los demócratas, aunque los republicanos, con fanfarria, se han esforzado por darse una nueva imagen y atraer más apoyo con los nuevos sectores demográficos. Verás que algunas de las voces más jóvenes del Partido Republicano (los senadores Rand Paul y Marco Rubio vienen a la mente) estarán a cargo de este esfuerzo.

 

#5 – Habrá una segunda vuelta - Dos estados con reñidas contiendas por el Senado crean la posibilidad de que haya una segunda vuelta. En ambos estados, si ningún candidato obtiene más del 50% de los votos, los dos primeros candidatos se enfrentarán en una segunda vuelta. En ambos estados hay tres o más candidatos, y en ningún estado ha obtenido alguno de ellos más del 50% en las encuestas recientes. En Luisiana, la segunda vuelta se llevaría a cabo el 6 de diciembre. En Georgia, el 6 de enero. Ambas contiendas están extremadamente reñidas, y debido a que una ligera mayoría en el Senado está en juego, es posible que no sepamos quién controla el Senado durante dos meses. Pero cabe mencionar la creencia popular de que a los republicanos les podría ir mejor al tener que elegir entre dos personas en una jornada electoral no tradicional en esos dos estados del sur. En 2008, por ejemplo, al senador Saxby Chambliss le faltó poco para llegar al 50% en la jornada electoral. En la segunda vuelta de diciembre, obtuvo más del 57% de los votos.

 

#6 – No habrá muchos cambios. Sí, podría haber una nueva mayoría en el Senado. Sí, es probable que los republicanos controlen ambas cámaras en el Capitolio. Controlarán el programa del pleno del Senado y controlarán qué audiencias se llevarán a cabo tanto en la Cámara como en el Senado. Será incluso más difícil para el presidente Obama obtener un voto de confirmación para un posible nominado a la Corte Suprema si hubiera una vacante. Pero los demócratas aún tendrán más de los 40 votos que necesitarán para bloquear cualquier legislación que quieran. Si lo que te enoja acerca de Washington (recuerda, los votantes están molestos) es que parece que no se logra nada, estas elecciones probablemente no te harán muy feliz.

 

#7 – Habrá mucha tensión para los gobernadores titulares. No ha habido un gobernador demócrata en Florida desde 1999. Así que este año, los demócratas postularon a un ex republicano. La principal trama de la noche electoral ha sido y siempre será el control del Senado, pero hay una serie de interesantes contiendas por las gobernaciones, y los votantes podrían enviarle un fuerte mensaje a los titulares y a los partidos titulares. Quizá la contienda más reñida y la más interesante de cualquier tipo es la contienda por la gobernación de Florida, donde Charlie Crist, el republicano que se volvió independiente y luego demócrata, busca volver a su antiguo empleo con un nuevo partido. Hay posibles disgustos en otros ámbitos. El gobernador republicano Scott Walker está empatado por mantener su empleo en Wisconsin. Lo mismo ocurre con el demócrata John Hickenlooper en Colorado y el republicano Nathan Deal en Georgia. Las encuestas no se ven bien para el gobernador republicano Tom Corbett en Pensilvania, ni para Paul LePage en Maine. No sería una sorpresa absoluta ver gobernadores republicanos en estados azules como Maryland y Massachusetts y gobernadores demócratas en estados rojos como Kansas y Georgia.

 

Edited by Te lo dije

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Creo que la #2 esta equivocada....en los años que llevo jamas habia visto tanta gente en mi colegio, ni siquiera para las eleccciones, tuve que hacer una filota para que me dieran la papéleta y luego otra fila en lo que se vaciaban las casetas... asi que definitivamente abran sorpresas....ojala sean positivas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Mientras parece que el exceso de grasa se le está acumulando en las 4 neuronas que le quedan en el cerebro, pidiendole a los boricuas que se doblen mas aun votando por los republicados que repudian las minorias.... :moron:

 

 

 

Jenniffer González hace campaña en Florida
Exhorta a los puertorriqueños a ejercer su derecho al voto

 

Jenniffer.jpg
Suministrada
Por ElVocero.com –  hace 41 minutos  7:16 am

En su carácter de vicepresidenta del Partido Republicano de Puerto Rico, Jenniffer González Colón participó en varias actividades en la Florida central este fin de semana, para promover la reelección del gobernador Rick Scott en las elecciones de hoy, ante la importancia del voto puertorriqueño en la zona.

“Los puertorriqueños tenemos una fuerte tradición de participar en los eventos electorales porque entendemos el poder del voto para la democracia. La triste realidad económica que enfrentamos ha obligado a que miles de boricuas se muden a la nación para poder salir a flote, convirtiendo el condado de Orange en Florida en el tercer condado con más puertorriqueños en todos los Estados Unidos. Somos una fuerza política importante”, expresó la también vicepresidenta del Partido Nuevo Progresista (PNP).

La representante subrayó la importancia de que cada uno de los puertorriqueños que tomó la decisión de salir de la isla para poder progresar y reconocieron a Estados Unidos como el lugar idóneo para ello, no dejen de ejercer su derecho al voto que le otorga la ciudadanía americana plena.

“Una ciudadanía bajo la estadidad donde mañana no solamente podrán elegir a su gobernador y otros funcionarios públicos estatales, sino a sus congresistas quienes gozan no solo de voz, sino de voto en la toma de decisiones que les afecta”, enfatizó.

González Colón fue una de las oradoras en el cierre de campaña de Rick Scott efectuado anoche en Orlando, Florida, donde no solo endosó su candidatura sino que exhortó a los latinos, sobre todo a los puertorriqueños, a salir a votar hoy.

En la actividad participaron, además, el gobernador de Louisiana, Bobby Jindal; el gobernador de Texas, Rick Perry; los congresistas por Florida John Mica y Daniel Webster; legisladores estatales y el representante por acumulación del PNP, José “Quiquito” Meléndez.

“El gobernador Scott, abogado, empresario, miembro de la Marina de los Estados Unidos, está enfocado en la economía, con una agresiva política de recortes de impuestos, redujo la deuda estatal, alcanzó un superávit de 1.2 billones de dólares, tiene bajo su logos sobre 600 mil empleos creados en el sector privado, redujo sustancialmente el desempleo de un 11.1% a un 6.1%. Además, sus aciertos en las decisiones económicas han provocado el aumento de un 22% en el valor de la propiedad”, añadió la portavoz del PNP en la Cámara.

La política participó el pasado domingo del Desfile Puertorriqueño de Kissimmee y ha estado activa en varios medios de comunicación exhortando a salir a votar hoy.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

El color de los republikkkanos alla es rojo no??

 

Pues mirenla haciendo capaña

 

chiquitota.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

 

El color de los republikkkanos alla es rojo no??

 

Pues mirenla haciendo capaña

 

chiquitota.jpg

 

Fooooooooo.... :hysterical:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
11:08 PM ET
 

Partido Republicano gana mayoría del Senado y obtiene el control del Congreso de EE.UU.

Sigue aquí toda la cobertura de CNN en Español de las elecciones. Participa con #VotoLatino2014

 

(CNN Español) – Según proyecciones de CNN, el Partido Republicano obtuvo el control del Congreso en las elecciones intermedias de EE.UU, al mantener la mayoría de la Cámara de Representantes y conseguir al menos 52 escaños del Senado.

 

Si estás viendo esta nota en tu móvil, mira aquí la galería.

 

El Partido Republicano recuperó el control del Senado ocho años después de mayoría demócrata en esa cámara legislativa.

 

Se escogía la totalidad de los 435 miembros de la Cámara de Representantes; 36 escaños del Senado —es decir una tercera parte del mismo—. Además se eligieron 36 gobernadores y la gran mayoría de legislaturas estatales en todo el país.

 

Los votantes también tuvieron la opción de pronunciarse sobre unas 146 iniciativas que van desde la legalización de la marihuana con fines recreativos en algunos estados, el aumento del salario mínimo o limitar el incremento de los impuestos. En Florida, los votantes se negaron a permitir la legalización de la marihuana medicinal.

Edited by Te lo dije

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0