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mimapr

What the United States Owes Puerto Rico

33 posts in this topic

What the United States Owes Puerto Rico

Allowing the U.S. territory to fall prey to the claws of vulture creditors is unjust and unacceptable.

 
The U.S. flag flies in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol in San Juan.ENLARGE
The U.S. flag flies in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol in San Juan. PHOTO: RICARDO ARDUENGO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
By 
JOSEPH E. STIGLITZ And
 
MARK MEDISH
Aug. 13, 2015 6:59 p.m. ET
 

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble recently quipped to his American counterpart, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, that he would gladly trade Greece for Puerto Rico. He was referring to the debt crises in both places and indirectly chiding Mr. Lew for offering unsolicited advice. While there are important differences, the Puerto Rican and Greek situations are similar enough to warrant comparison for policy lessons, though perhaps not the ones intended by Mr. Schäuble.

Both are cases of fiscal mismanagement and unsustainable external debt in the context of fixed exchange rates through a common currency, the U.S. dollar for Puerto Rico and the euro for Greece. Equally striking, both Puerto Rico and Greece represent quasi-colonial dependencies of distant powers in Washington and Berlin (via Brussels). Though there is an important distinction: Greece chose to join the eurozone; Puerto Rico never chose to become an unincorporated U.S. territory. The islands, more than a 1,000 miles south of Miami, were acquired from Spain in 1898 after the Spanish-American War.

Washington has since been content to play absentee landlord. The commonwealth of Puerto Rico is neither fish nor fowl in the constitutional order. It lacks both the privileges of a U.S. state and the powers of a sovereign. Indeed, its relationship to the U.S. gives the lie to the notion of a “commonwealth.” The U.S. wants the benefits of an offshore tax haven without the responsibilities to rescue it in time of need.

Washington treats Puerto Ricans as second-class citizens. The list of slights is long and depressing. The territory receives reduced Medicare and Medicaid coverage. Corporate tax holidays were granted and capriciously withdrawn by Congress. The North American Free Trade Agreement has beggared Puerto Rico through substantial trade diversion in favor of Mexico. And the 1920 Jones Act forces the U.S. territory to use high-cost American shipping carriers.

Excluding unfunded pensions, Puerto Rico has a debt burden of more than $70 billion, which it cannot service. Most of Puerto Rico’s private creditors—such as OppenheimerFunds and Franklin Templeton Investments, the latter also a large creditor of Ukraine—insist that Puerto Rico merely has a serious short-term liquidity problem but is not insolvent. Yet absent a comprehensive long-term growth strategy, this is a distinction without a difference. The territory can’t pay its debts today, and with short-term debt financing at the high interest rates demanded by creditors, it will be even less able to pay its debts tomorrow.

Private creditors are unwilling to admit they made foolish investments, lured by the triple tax break on Puerto Rico’s municipal bonds. And once again the investment funds and banks, rating agencies and insurers who failed to do due diligence on the debtor’s capacity to pay will attempt to shift the blame. Vulture funds swooped in late, looking for a killing.

At risk is not only Puerto Rico but the safety and soundness of the rest of the $4 trillion U.S. municipal-bond market. After Detroit’s bankruptcy, who knows what other jurisdictions have fiscal weaknesses that should be more closely scrutinized? Contagion from Puerto Rico could mean higher municipal borrowing costs across the U.S., especially with muni-bond insurers raising premiums, or even pulling back from providing insurance altogether.

What is to be done? Putting aside a change in sovereign status—a “Prexit” resulting in either independence or U.S. statehood—the practical options for Puerto Rico are limited. But action by Washington is imperative to prevent further social hardship.

First, the U.S. bankruptcy code, which currently excludes Puerto Rico, should be amended to include it and open the way for orderly debt relief. If the code is not amended, Puerto Rico should be allowed to promulgate its own bankruptcy law. Up until now, this common-sense reform has been blocked in the courts by private creditors fearing the haircuts that they richly deserve, and which would enable Puerto Rico to have a fresh start.

Second, if the U.S. is unwilling to provide assistance, Puerto Rico should be allowed to bring in the International Monetary Fund for official assistance. Washington currently rejects IMF involvement, but why exactly? If the IMF is good medicine for Greece, why is it not good medicine for Puerto Rico?

The IMF would certainly conduct a debt sustainability analysis concluding that most of Puerto Rico’s debt must be restructured or forgiven, as it has proposed for Greece. Much as the IMF has demanded key legislative changes in Greece to qualify for assistance, it would likely recommend that the U.S. Congress amend the U.S. bankruptcy code and the Jones Act, and adjust the minimum wage in Puerto Rico to make workers there more competitive. The reform in bankruptcy law is especially important: Allowing Puerto Rico to fall prey to the claws of vulture creditors is unjust and unacceptable.

Third, and most fundamentally, the U.S. must take responsibility for its imperialist past and neocolonial present. Washington owes Puerto Ricans a future based on democratic legitimacy and a financially and socially viable development strategy—a development strategy that is more than a set of tax breaks for profitable U.S. corporations.

Mr. Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate in economics, is a professor at Columbia and the author of “The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them” (W.W. Norton, 2015). Mr. Medish was a senior Treasury official during the Clinton administration.

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Hola MIMA, no te molestes en poner estos posts en inglés; ya que los PNEPÉS REVENTADOS tales como tonmen , Mobutu Sese, Te Lo Dije y Paladín que opinan por este foro no saben inglés, ni hablado, ni escrito, ni leído.

Ahora, también están en contra de que el español sea el primer idioma oficial ( aunque no saben inglés ) por que dizque y que se relegará el inglés a un segundo plano. A esto se le llama SURREALISMO EN SU PURO ESTADO - odian el español, adoran el inglés pero no lo entienden - como se le llama a esto???

Ninguno se atreverá a contestarte una opinión en inglés del tema en cuestión. Son cuponeros y viven del welfare y ya tu sabes...:hysterical:

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Los Eu no le deben nada a la colonia ya bastante han tenido de nuestras contribuciones federales de cachete. El que los partidos se los robaran son otros veinte pesos. El que el gobierno actual quiera arrastrar los pies para la solución del estatus también.

Aquí los únicos que se deben algo son los colonizados a sí mismos. Aprendan a vivir con dignidad, no como los arrartraos que les gustan las margaritas. 

:hysterical:

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CUPONERO" de Lloren.:moron2:

Ya anda  opinando de un tema que no ha leído ya que no sabe inglés. :moron2:

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Hay que reconocer que Dona Mima tiene un punto. Yo pense en esto tambien. Lo que importa es no haber caido en las garras de Comunismo, Chavimo etc. :diablo:

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On August 16, 2015 at 10:57:06 AM, atano said:

CUPONERO" de Lloren.:moron2:

Ya anda  opinando de un tema que no ha leído ya que no sabe inglés. :moron2:

Atano......deseo aclarar algo...Primero, No soy PNP.....mi lealtad es a la patria no a partido político alguno....Segundo, si vamos a hablar de gente ignorante del idioma ingles le pido por favor se refiera al líder máximo de la colonia tropical..Tercero..en mi humilde empleo en la ciudad de los rascacielos es necesario el poder hablar y ENTENDER ingles, razón por la cual defiendo el bilingüismo ... Cuarto..Como usted, no apruebo al que vive del gobierno, pero no olvidemos que es la meta del PPD el crear cuponeros...Quinto.. el Imperio puede que le deba a la isla, pero también existe algo que se conoce como responsabilidad fiscal , algo que en la isla han ignorado por décadas..Sexto...no podemos ignorar que es el ELA y el status colonial que defiende uno de los factores esenciales en el debacle socio económico que los propios isleños han creado...

Edited by Mobutu Sese

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ap-341122722204.jpg

holding Puerto Rico back

The territory is hamstrung by obscure regulations. It's time to loosen those cords.

By Anne O. Krueger

 
 
 

Puerto Rico’s economy is in crisis. On Tuesday, the territory faces a critical deadline when it must pay back a $354 million bond payment. Whether the island has the funds to make that payment is unclear. But even if it does, the territory is almost certain to be unable to keep paying its teachers, police, and other vital employees within a few months without action in San Juan and Washington, D.C.

This morning the Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing about an important first step in the process: granting Puerto Rico access to Chapter 9 bankruptcy, which provides an orderly framework for agencies of states, such as municipalities and state-owned enterprises, to work out unsustainable debts. Under current law Puerto Rico is unfairly denied this right, which politicians from Jeb Bush to Hillary Clinton have called on Congress to fix.

Chapter 9, however, is only part of the story. To an extent few politicians in Washington understand, Puerto Rico is also hobbled by a number of federal regulations and laws that take away its flexibility to deal with its own problems, including insufficient funding for health care programs, a minimum wage that makes Puerto Rico uncompetitive with other Caribbean islands and being ineligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit. Fixing these problems is a necessary step to turning the island around.

In health care, Puerto Rico is covered by most federal welfare legislation—but the island receives lower reimbursement rates from Medicare and Medicaid than the other 50 states, even though it pays the same taxes as they do. The burden of covering these costs falls to the Puerto Rican government, straining its budget. This disadvantage is caused by the formula used to distribute block-grant funds, which needs to be adjusted to reduce the territory’s financing gap.

At tax time, Puerto Ricans are also ineligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit, which encourages work by providing an income supplement to low-income workers. In turn, this has caused a sizeable informal economy to develop, reducing tax revenue and increasing spending as more people collect welfare payments.

At the same time, Puerto Rico is subject to the federal minimum wage which is currently $7.25 per hour. The resulting higher labor costs force Puerto Rican businesses to raise prices, making the island more expensive for tourists than neighboring Caribbean nations.

Other federally-mandated measures also adversely affect the economy. The Jones Act, for example, mandates that all shipping between the island and the mainland be carried on U.S. ships, which raises transportation costs and makes the island less competitive with its neighbors. 

These regulations and laws all make it harder for businesses to locate or expand on the island and have caused more workers to opt for collecting welfare over working. As a result, the labor force participation rate is only 40 percent (compared with 62 percent on the mainland). Others have chosen to migrate to the continental United States for jobs, furthering reducing the tax base.

Successive administrations used fiscal stimulus in an effort to reverse this decline. But the decline was not the result of a lack of demand, as the mainland faced after the Great Recession. Instead, it was due to underlying structural difficulties. Now, debt has mounted to a point where further deficit financing is not feasible and a cash shortfall is looming.

Addressing all of these issues won’t solve all of the underlying problems facing the island. The territory also needs to become more business friendly by streamlining government regulations and moving to a more predictable tax regime. It has already begun adopting legislation to correct some of these issues. But much more must be done. The economy won't turn around unless Puerto Rico does its part too.

 

Puerto Rico ought to be the jewel of the Caribbean—a scenic and historic island with U.S. dollars as its currency, legal processes protected by the U.S., and U.S. citizenship for its population. It could be a financial center for businesses with activities in both North and South America, and a stellar tourist attraction.

While Puerto Rico has already undertaken ambitious economic reforms, it needs to do much more to reach that goal. First, though, the commonwealth needs support from the federal government. These changes won’t turn around Puerto Rico overnight. But with the right decisions, and the right kind of support from Washington, it should be able to start attracting new business, strengthening the economy and restoring sustainable economic growth.

Anne O. Krueger is a senior research professor of international economics at Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies and a professor of economics emeritus at Stanford University. She was the first deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund from 2001-2006. She is a paid adviser to Puerto Rico on financial and economic issues.

Note: Anne Kruger's bio as been updated to reflect her relationship with the government of Puerto Rico.

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Por lo que leo en ese artículo de la Krueger, aun después de todos los millones que le ha pagado el M,o.r.o.n:chkn:, presenta uno de los mejores argumentos de porque la colonia debe desaparecer y convertirse en un estado.

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Eso es uno de esos artículos donde el gobierno colonial paga para que lo escriban y publiquen. Como esta en la nomina del PPD, esta lumbrera convenientemente ignora el status colonial  al cual los Populares se aferran y es una de las causas principales del presente debacle economice que la colonia experimenta hoy día.

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2 hours ago, Mobutu Sese said:

Eso es uno de esos artículos donde el gobierno colonial paga para que lo escriban y publiquen. Como esta en la nomina del PPD, esta lumbrera convenientemente ignora el status colonial  al cual los Populares se aferran y es una de las causas principales del presente debacle economice que la colonia experimenta hoy día.

No hay "lumbreras", que puedan convencer a NADIE de que el estatus actual se puede mejorar.:Erm:

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El Imperio tiene   que tomar control total de su colonia...los colonizados son tan incompetentes, rehusan a adoptar disciplina fiscal alguna y defienden la corrupción...eso es lo único que los puede salvar. Back to those years before 1952.

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Congress speeding toward battle over Puerto Rican debt

 

puertorico_122315getty.jpg?itok=OfgOzF6O
Getty

By Peter Schroeder - 12/27/15 06:00 AM EST

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has elevated debt relief for Puerto Rico to the top of the congressional agenda in 2016.

Officials in Puerto Rico implored Congress for action before the holiday recess, warning that they are faced with either paying their debts or keeping critical public services functioning.

Despite those warnings, help for Puerto Rico did not make the cut in the $1.1 trillion omnibus bill that Congress passed in December.

Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Garcia-Padilla (D) blasted Congress for failing to include language in the omnibus package, accusing lawmakers of acceding to hedge funds invested in the island’s debt. 

“By not acting now, Congress has opted for the U.S. Commonwealth to default on its obligations and unfold into chaos,” he said in a statement. “Once again Wall Street has demonstrated its control over Congress; Wall Street rules Congress.”

In an effort to tamp down Democratic grumbling and ward off a potential revolt, Ryan made a public commitment to act on the matter in the first three months of 2016.

“I am instructing our House committees of jurisdiction to work with the Puerto Rican government to come up with a responsible solution by the end of the first quarter of next year,” he said in a statement one day after the omnibus was unveiled.

But while Ryan has committed to act, the parties remain deeply divided over what to do, and it’s an open question whether the Speaker’s March 31 deadline will be sufficient.

Garcia Padilla has reason to be anxious. He has warned that Puerto Rico will have a tough time coming up with $957 million owed on interest payments on Jan. 1, not to mention another $422 million owed May 1.

But for now, Ryan’s statement appeared to have quelled restless Democrats — all but 18 House Democrats voted for the spending bill. 

“I’m delighted that he made that statement, I’m very grateful to Speaker Ryan. He’s been one of the few good shining lights in all of this,” said Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.), who nonetheless opposed the omnibus for its lack of Puerto Rico relief, among other things. 

Lawmakers will have just a few months, at best, to find a solution to the debt debate.

Puerto Rico first raised the warning flag in June, when Garcia Padilla said publicly that the island would not be able to pay back all its debt. Years of a struggling economy, a shrinking population, and heavy borrowing has left the territory with a debt load of roughly $70 billion, and little revenue to pay it back. 

Democrats argue that giving Puerto Rico bankruptcy power is critical, and island officials have made it their top ask of Congress. The White House has also backed that approach, saying a restructuring of Puerto Rico’s debt is inevitable and should be done in an organized way through bankruptcy.

But Republicans have resisted that approach, questioning whether it is fair to rework contracts via bankruptcy after years of fiscal mistakes by local officials.

A trio of Senate Republican chairmen unveiled legislation earlier this month that would give Puerto Rico $3 billion in federal relief, and also establish a new independent authority to oversee the island’s finances.

Some Republicans have argued that average investors could be hurt by Puerto Rican bankruptcy, given the bonds’ place in a host of mutual funds. And hedge funds that bought into the island’s debt have hired a host of lobbyists and DC professionals to push back strongly against any attempt to let the territory shake off some of that debt. 

Democrats are clearly eager to take action. The day before lawmakers left town for the holiday break, a host of heavyweight Democratic senators unveiled their plan to help alleviate the island’s troubles temporarily.

The bill, offered by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (Nev.), as well as Sens. Charles Schumer (N.Y.), Richard Blumenthal (Conn.) and Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), would protect Puerto Rico from creditor lawsuits until Ryan’s March 31 deadline.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) attempted to bring up similar legislation on the House floor just before the chamber voted on the omnibus funding bill in its last vote of 2015. Republicans rebuffed her.

Meanwhile, in Puerto Rico, the government is struggling to rein in costs. After strikes by some public workers, the island government paid out about $120 million in bonuses to public employees, as required by law.

When push comes to shove, Garcia Padilla has been adamant about where he wants to put the island’s dwindling funds.

“I was elected to protect the people of Puerto Rico,” he said earlier this month. “If anyone puts me into a position from selecting to pay a creditor, or a policeman, a teacher, a firefighter, I will pay the policeman, teacher or firefighter. There’s no doubt about it.”

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He was elected by the people but he sworn  to obey the Constitution...and the Constitution says pay bonds debts before paying your own people. 

Pero el pueblo de Macondo nunca exigio, ni ha exigido, ni va a exigir responsabilidad fiscal alguna. Se confirma con los politicos que apoyan, con la enorme burocracia que apoyan, con como desperdician el dinero y como no le piden cuentas  al presente y previos gobernadores. Después no se quejen si no hay dinero para el RETIRO...a ver si el gas pela.

Edited by Mobutu Sese

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The GOP’s undemocratic recipe for Puerto Rico

By Luis Gallardo - 12/23/15 05:00 PM EST

 

In recent days, two proposals concerning Puerto Rico’s delicate fiscal situation have been presented in the U.S. Congress. These bills, spearheaded by Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Wis.) and Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) respond to recent hearings concerning the matter in the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Nevertheless, said bills propose undemocratic methods to handle the matter and fail to cure the root of the problem.

Both projects propose the creation of a federal oversight body that would have the ability to decide the Commonwealth government’s annual budgets and would be composed of members selected by the president. To alleviate Puerto Rico’s situation, Duffy’s proposal includes Puerto Rico in the Bankruptcy Code’s Chapter 9 protections. Meanwhile, the Senate proposal excludes Chapter 9 inclusion but offers $3 billion to assist Puerto Rico with its cash liquidity woes and a five-year, 50 percent reduction in Social Security taxes. Despite the incentives, these projects effectively knock back the administration of Puerto Rico’s finances to the days of U.S. military occupation.  

According to economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin in a recent testimony before a senatorial hearing, “Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection for Puerto Rican governmental entities, would not improve economic growth, would not change the budget trajectory. Nevertheless, Puerto Rico once enjoyed Chapter 9 protections up until 1984 when the island was quietly squeezed out of the Bankruptcy Code with the approval of unrelated amendments. Congressional records are mute on the reasons why the island was specifically excluded, and said amendments passed with no reaction or protest from Puerto Rico’s non-voting member of the House of Representative at the time.

Congress wants to assure that federal assistance will not be in vain, and many legislators have clamored for long-term solutions to prevent further crisis. Despite this, the problem has less to do with the lack of federal oversight and more with the lack of citizen oversight. Politicians are free to borrow and spend as they wish, as citizens do not vote for bond proposals — a mechanism present in local and state governments throughout the U.S., as well as the world. This lack of citizen participation is worsened by the fact that all elected positions are up for grabs simultaneously each four years. There is no city council district; council members are handpicked by mayoral candidates. Victorious mayors are awarded almost four-fifths of council seats, effectively making municipal legislatures a rubber stamp for mayoral borrowing and spending.

The alienation of voters from Puerto Rico’s political system has resulted in an unstable, back-and-forth exchange of power between the two principal political parties. Though the Commonwealth’s bureaucracy and partisan politics have failed to steer the island clear of financial chaos, basic civil checks and balances should be considered before handing over Puerto Rico’s finances to a federal control board.

  "Politicians are free to borrow and spend as they wish, as citizens do not vote for bond proposals — a mechanism present in local and state governments throughout the U.S., as well as the world"

Aquí tienen la causa de la botaera de dinero con prestamos a base de venta de bonos. Nosotros, el pueblo, no tenemos control alguno sobre estas emisiones, que son las que nos han llevado a la quiebra total. Quienes han hecho esas emisiones?, pues los dos partidos que por aquí tanto defienden.:hp:

 

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Pero es a todos los isleños a quienes le corresponde pagarlo por irresponsables. De la falta de democracia bajo el ELA colonial Tonmen hablo hace tiempo. De cómo cada cuatro años le entregan un cheque en blanco a los que ganan el certamen mediático y luego no se preocupan por lo que está pasando también hablamos.

 

Ahora a pagar o a sacar su pasaporte.:hysterical:

 

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Los irresponsables han sido, los dos bandos políticos que sabiendo el "loophole" que provee la ley, se aprovecharon hasta desmadrar al país y ahora pretenden que el pueblo pague los platos rotos por ellos.

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Cada pueblo tiene a los gobernantes que se merece

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To fix Macondo...ONLY UNDEMOCRATIC METHODS WILL WORK......Let them have a say and nothing will happen...just status quo!

Macondo politicians are TOO IRRESPONSIBLE to be trusted.

The evidence is overwhelming.

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S&P downgrades Puerto Rican bonds after default

 
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Getty Images

By Sylvan Lane - 01/05/16 02:25 PM EST

Standard & Poor's Rating Services dealt a blow to cash-strapped Puerto Rico on Tuesday, downgrading infrastructure bonds secured by rum taxes to default status, according to Reuters.

The downgrade comes one day after the Puerto Rico Infrastructure Financing Authority defaulted on a $35.9 million interest payment. Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro García Padilla (D) warned last week that the commonwealth would miss that payment and another $1.4 million payment to its Public Finance Corp.

Puerto Rico, with almost $1 billion in debt, faces a dire financial crisis. Island leaders pleaded with Congress for relief in last month's omnibus spending bill, specifically for power to declare bankruptcy, but to no avail.

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) blocked a bill offered by Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) last month giving Puerto Rico access to bankruptcy courts, which would have allowed the commonwealth to restructure its debt. Schumer warned of widespread problems if Puerto Rico's crisis isn't solved, but Hatch, the Senate Finance Committee chairman, objected and said Schumer's plan wasn't an efficient solution.

"I don't know of anyone in this chamber who is indifferent to the issues facing our fellow American citizens in Puerto Rico," Hatch said. "I agree with the senior senator from New York that Congress must act to address these problems."

One day after the omnibus spending bill passed, Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) committed to a "responsible solution" for Puerto Rico by March 31. 

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Luis Gutiérrez aseguró su reelección al Congreso

El legislador federal boricua obtuvo más votos que nunca

viernes, 18 de marzo de 2016 - 10:27 AM

 
luis gutierrez (horizontal-x3)

Luis Gutiérrez obtuvo 89,658 votos, en una primaria en el distrito 4 que rompió todos los récords de participación. (Archivo/GFR)

 

WASHINGTON- En una primaria que movilizó más gente que nunca - lo cual atribuye a la alarma que genera entre la comunidad hispana la precandidatura presidencial del republicano Donald Trump-, Luis Gutiérrez aseguró su reelección al Congreso como representante del distrito 4 de Chicago (Illinois).

Gutiérrez obtuvo casi 90,000 votos el pasado martes y el 75.3% de respaldo, para barrer al también boricua Javier Salas que le retó por la candidatura demócrata.

Los republicanos no presentaron oponente en contra de Gutiérrez, por lo que su candidatura demócrata le garantiza un nuevo término de dos años tras las elecciones generales de noviembre próximo.

Gutiérrez obtuvo 89,658 votos, en una primaria en el distrito 4 que rompió todos los récords de participación. Obtuvo incluso más votos que en las elecciones legislativas de noviembre de 2014.

"Lo más que había recibido en una primaria eran 38,000 votos. Mi contrincante, que solo recibió 24.7%) de respaldo, obtuvo casi 30,000. Sigo recibiendo más del 75% de apoyo en mi distrito ¿Pero, por qué tanta gente salió a votar? La respuesta es Trump", dijo Gutiérrez.

El legislador boricua considera que la votación del martes, aunque volvió a reflejar el masivo respaldo que tiene dentro de su distrito – con un alto porcentaje de mexicoamericanos y boricuas-, el verdadero mensaje que lleva es "que el partido está más fuerte que nunca".

"La gente está decidida a participar", indicó Gutiérrez, al indicar que sin minimizar el interés en la contienda demócrata entre Hillary Clinton y Bernie Sanders, piensa que el verdadero asunto que sacó más gente a votar es la decisión de los demócratas de salir a combatir a Trump.

"Esos 90,000 no solo votaron por mí, salieron a votar por el candidato a presidente y el resto de los miembros del partido", señaló Gutiérrez, en una entrevista.

El congresista boricua ha respaldado la precandidatura presidencial de Hillary Clinton.

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